+AA
Fr
Back
Public Health Article

Health education programmes to improve foot self-care practices and foot problems among older people with diabetes: A systematic review



Review Quality Rating: 7 (moderate)

Citation: Ahmad Sharoni S, Minhat H, Mohod Zulkefli N, & Baharom A. (2016). Health education programmes to improve foot self-care practices and foot problems among older people with diabetes: A systematic review. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 11(3), 214-239.

PubMed LinkOut

Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:To assess the effectiveness of health education programmes to improve foot self-care practices and foot problems among older people with diabetes.
BACKGROUND:The complications of diabetes among older people are a major health concern. Foot problems such as neuropathy, ulcer and ultimately amputation are a great burden on older people with diabetes. Diabetes foot education programmes can influence the behaviour of older people in practising foot self-care and controlling the foot problems. However, the educational approaches used by the educators are different. Therefore, it is important to assess the education programmes from various evidence-based practices.
DESIGN: Six databases, EBSCOhost medical collections (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection), SAGE, Wiley Online Library, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink and Web of Science, were used to search for articles published from January 2000 to March 2015. The search was based on the inclusion criteria and keywords including 'foot', 'care' and 'diabetes'. Fourteen studies were assessed and reviewed in the final stage.
CONCLUSIONS:Health education programmes varied according to their design, setting, approach, outcome measured and results. Foot assessment, verbal and written instructions and discussion were proved to improve the foot self-care and foot problems. Subsequent follow-ups and evaluations had a significant effect. An improvement was observed in foot self-care scores and foot problems (such as neuropathy, foot disability, lesion, ulcer, tinea pedis and callus grade) after implementation of the health education programme.
IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:The findings of this study support the claim that a health education programme increases the foot self-care scores and reduces the foot problems. However, there were certain methodological concerns in the reviewed articles, indicating the need for further evaluation. In future, researchers and practitioners must implement a vigorous education programme focusing on diabetes foot self-care among the older population.


Keywords

Community, Diabetes, Education / Awareness & Skill Development / Training, Health Care Setting, Senior Health, Seniors (60+ years)

Register for free access to all Professional content

Register
Want the latest in aging research? Sign up for our email alerts.
Subscribe

Support for the Portal is largely provided by the Labarge Optimal Aging Initiative. AGE-WELL is a contributing partner. Help us to continue to provide direct and easy access to evidence-based information on health and social conditions to help you stay healthy, active and engaged as you grow older. Donate Today.

© 2012 - 2020 McMaster University | 1280 Main Street West | Hamilton, Ontario L8S4L8 | +1 905-525-9140 | Terms Of Use