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Kidney disease

There are a number of risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Some risk factors you can control, such as smoking, while others you cannot, such as aging. Often there are no symptoms until kidney disease is quite advanced, which is why screening and early detection are so important. Read more below.

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  • Evidence Summary

    Alpha-blockers as medical expulsive therapy for ureteral stones.

    Cochrane Database Syst Rev (2018)
  • Web Resource Rating

    Screening for chronic kidney disease: Consumer fact sheet

    U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)
    Older age, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and a family history put you at higher risk for kidney disease. There is not enough evidence to weigh the benefits and harms of screening for kidney disease among adults who don't have diabetes, high blood pressure or symptoms of kidney disease.
  • Evidence Summary

    Interventions for chronic kidney disease-associated restless legs syndrome.

    Cochrane Database Syst Rev (2016)
  • Web Resource Rating

    Kidney Failure: What Type of Dialysis Should I Have?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps individuals with kidney failure considering dialysis methods decide on whether to have hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Kidney Failure: When Should I Start Dialysis?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps people decide when to start either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. It outlines options such as starting before or waiting until either after having symptoms or your lab results get worse by comparing the benefits, risks and side effects of both options.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Kidney Failure: What Type of Dialysis Should I Have?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps individuals with kidney failure considering dialysis methods decide on whether to have hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Kidney Failure: When Should I Start Dialysis?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps people decide when to start either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. It outlines options such as starting before or waiting until either after having symptoms or your lab results get worse by comparing the benefits, risks and side effects of both options.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Advance Care Planning: Should I stop kidney dialysis?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps people with kidney failure currently undergoing dialysis, and for whom kidney transplantation is not possible, decide on whether or not to stop the treatment. It facilitates the process by comparing the benefits, risks and side effects of both options.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Advance Care Planning: Should I stop kidney dialysis?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps people with kidney failure currently undergoing dialysis, and for whom kidney transplantation is not possible, decide on whether or not to stop the treatment. It facilitates the process by comparing the benefits, risks and side effects of both options.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Kidney infection

    Mayo Clinic
    Kidney infections require prompt medical attention. Talk to your doctor if you experience fever, back/side/groin/abdominal pain, frequent urination, strong urge to urinate, burning sensation when urinating, or pus or blood in your urine.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Chronic kidney disease

    Health Link B.C.
    Diabetes and high blood pressure are the two main causes of chronic kidney disease. Changes in how much you urinate, fatigue, sleep problems and nausea are all signs of loss of kidney function. Avoid long term use of medications that may damage your kidneys, exercise regularly and eat a diet low in protein, sodium and fat to reduce your risk of kidney disease.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Chronic kidney disease

    Mayo Clinic
    Chronic kidney disease results in a slow loss of kidney function. Treatment is meant to slow down this process. You may not notice symptoms until the disease is advanced. Complications include high blood pressure, anemia and retaining fluids.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Acute kidney failure

    Mayo Clinic
    In acute kidney failure, your kidneys stop working over a few hours or days. You may notice swelling and decreased amount of urine. It is most common among people who are critically ill, although otherwise healthy people can recover.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Low-phosphorus diet: Best for kidney disease?

    Mayo Clinic
    Kidney disease can lead to too much phosphorus in the blood and increase the risk of bone and heart disease. A low-phosphorus diet can help. To limit phosphorus in your diet, avoid fast food, processed food and drinks with phosphorus in them. Diet suggestions and substitutes in this resource.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Kidney cysts

    Mayo Clinic
    The risk of developing kidney cysts increases as you age. Simple kidney cysts do not usually have symptoms or need treatment. Talk to your doctor if you experience a fever and dull pain in your back, side or upper abdomen.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Reducing your risk for kidney cancer

    Canadian Cancer Society
    Limit your risk of kidney cancer by avoiding smoking, being active and maintaining a healthy weight. Test your blood pressure and talk to your doctor about ways to lower high blood pressure. Avoid exposure to dangerous chemicals.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Kidney Stones: Should I Have Lithotripsy to Break Up the Stone?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps individuals suffering with kidney stones and considering treatment decide on whether or not to have lithotripsy by comparing the benefits, risks and side effects of both options.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Kidney Stones: Should I Have Lithotripsy to Break Up the Stone?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps individuals suffering with kidney stones and considering treatment decide on whether or not to have lithotripsy by comparing the benefits, risks and side effects of both options.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Kidney Failure: Should I Start Dialysis?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps people with kidney failure decide on whether or not to start kidney dialysis by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Kidney Failure: Should I Start Dialysis?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps people with kidney failure decide on whether or not to start kidney dialysis by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Kidney disease: Changing your diet

    WebMD
    If you have kidney disease, change your diet - limit your intake of salt, fluids and protein. Talk to your doctor or your dietitian and get the help you need to make these changes.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Dialysis

    NHS Choices
    Dialysis is a life-saving treatment that replicates the kidneys’ function when your kidneys stop working properly.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Living with kidney disease

    NHS Choices
    Cope with the challenges of kidney disease by exercising regularly to keep fit. Stay positive while on dialysis, and look for useful and fulfilling ways to spend your time during these treatments. Talk to your doctor if you are having sexual problems. .

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