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Men's health

What puts a man’s health at risk as he gets older? The top risk factors are common and often preventable. From cardiovascular disease, to prostate cancer and even chronic respiratory disease – healthy aging threats can be significantly reduced through simple lifestyle changes. Take an active role in your health and read our resources for more information.

Screening for prostate cancer: What you should know about the PSA test
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Improved treatments provide relief for men with lower urinary tract symptoms
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'Plumbing' problems? Ultrasound an easier way to detect bladder obstructions
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  • Web Resource Rating

    Prostate cancer: Patient FAQ

    Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
    The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care does not recommend men get screened for prostate cancer with a PSA test because the harms outweigh the benefits. The harms of screening include: false positives, over-diagnosis, infection, erectile dysfunction, urine leakage and biopsy complications.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Prostate cancer - 1000-Person tool

    Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
    The Canadian Task Force on Prevent Health Care does not recommend men get screened for prostate cancer with a PSA test. The potential harms of screening and follow-up treatment do not outweigh the small benefits.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Prostate cancer: Infographic

    Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
    Prostate cancer screening with a PSA test is not recommended because there are more potential harms than benefits.
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    Testosterone therapy: Potential benefits and risks as you age

    Mayo Clinic
    Testosterone levels will naturally decline with age. Talk to your doctor if you have a medical condition that affects testosterone. Testosterone therapy has risks and is not recommended as a treatment for normal aging.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Benign enlarged prostate

    Informed Health Online
    If you have an enlarged prostate, practice pelvic floor exercises, keep watch for any changes, and talk to your doctor about potential medications.
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    Benign enlarged prostate: Medication and herbal products

    Informed Health Online
    Herbal medicine products such as saw palmetto and stinging nettle root extracts may claim to relieve symptoms of benign enlarged prostate, but studies show that these products do not actually help. Other treatments include alpha blockers (tamsulosin), enzyme inhibitors (finasteride), and anticholinergics. Alpha blockers have been proven effective, but have side effects. Talk to your doctor to find out which treatment is right for you.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Benign enlarged prostate: Surgery - advantages and disadvantages

    Informed Health Online
    Surgery is not usually needed for benign enlarged prostate. It may be an option, however, if the enlarged prostate is causing urinary tract infections or bladder stones, or if other treatments are not helping. The transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is considered to be the standard surgical approach. There are other variations of TURP, as well as laser treatments and heat therapy. Talk to your doctor to find out what treatment is right for you.
  • Evidence Summary

    In obese men, diet and exercise programs can lead to weight loss

    Health Technol Assess (2014)
  • Web Resource Rating

    Male menopause: Myth or reality?

    Mayo Clinic
    Low testosterone causes changes in sex and sleep patterns. A healthy diet and exercise can help maintain your strength and energy. Speak to your doctor if you have concerns and be wary of herbal supplements.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Male condoms

    Our Bodies, Ourselves
    Condoms protect against sexually transmitted infections. Carry condoms with you and use them correctly. This resource includes frequently asked questions about using condoms.
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    Belly fat in men: Why weight loss matters

    Mayo Clinic
    For men, a waist size larger than 40 inches is an unhealthy amount of belly fat and increases risk of health problems. Slow weight loss through healthy eating and physical activity can help keep excess weight off.
  • Web Resource Rating

    From teeth to testes: Three minutes to maintain your manliness

    HealthLine
    Diet, lifestyle, and attitude are key to maintaining men's health. Good sleep habits, caring for your teeth, avoiding sugary drinks, exercising and managing your stress can help increase your chances of a long and healthy life.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Hair loss

    Mayo Clinic
    Hair loss can affect men and women and is more common as we age. Effective treatments include medications, surgery or laser therapy. Wigs or hairpieces are an alternative. A healthy diet and treating your hair gently can help prevent hair loss. See your doctor if you have sudden or patchy loss of hair.
  • Web Resource Rating

    6 natural remedies for enlarged prostate (BPH)

    HealthLine
    Natural remedies such as saw palmetto, beta-sitosterol, pygeum, rye grass pollen extract and stinging nettle may help relieve enlarged prostate symptoms - more research is needed. Herbal remedies can have side effects and interact with other medications. Long term effects are often unknown. Ask your doctor before taking these supplements.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Men's health: Prevent the top threats

    Mayo Clinic
    Many of the leading causes of death among men (heart disease, stroke, cancer and respiratory disease) can be prevented. A healthy diet, staying physically active, quitting smoking and limiting alcohol, managing stress and getting recommended health screenings will all help improve your health.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Rx for change: The low-down on low-t (or menopause for men)

    National Women’s Health Network
    Be skeptical about testosterone products for men with 'Low-T' (low testosterone or late-onset hypogonadism). Testosterone levels fluctuate and commonly decrease as men age. Low testosterone is normal among older men and 'Low-T' products can increase the risk of heart problems.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Prevention diet: 7 foods for an enlarged prostate

    HealthLine
    Eating more vegetables can help lower your risk of enlarged prostate. Good food choices for prostate health: sesame seeds, salmon, tofu, bell peppers, tomatoes, avocados, leafy greens, onions and garlic.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Urinary incontinence

    Patient.co.uk
    Urinary incontinence is when you pass urine (pee) without meaning to. Treatment depends on the cause. Cut down on caffeine, avoid drinking late at night, lose weight if overweight, avoid constipation and ask your doctor about what might be causing incontinence.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Penis health: Identify and prevent problems

    Mayo Clinic
    Problems of the penis include issues with erections, with the foreskin, discharge or blood from the penis, pain, rash or swelling and can be a sign of other health conditions or medication side-effects. Practice good hygiene, safe sex and stay active to maintain your penis health.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Testosterone therapy: Potential benefits and risks as you age

    Mayo Clinic
    Testosterone therapy can increase risk of sleep problems, blood clots, enlarged breasts and more. Talk to your doctor about the risk and benefits if considering this type of hormone therapy.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Benign enlarged prostate: What can I do myself?

    Informed Health Online
    An enlarged prostate can cause you to urinate (pee) frequently. Limit your fluids before bed, avoid alcohol, caffeine or medications that affect your bladder, and try the double-voiding technique.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Performance anxiety and "water tablets" for high blood pressure

    Evidently Cochrane
    Your doctor may prescribe medication to lower your high blood pressure and your risk of heart problems. Some blood pressure medications may increase the risk of erectile dysfunction but there are no studies that have looked at this issue.
  • Web Resource Rating

    A visual guide to low testosterone

    WebMD
    A slow drop in testosterone is a normal part of aging. But low testosterone can cause visible changes to the body, osteoporosis, reduced sex drive, mood changes, or poor concentration. Talk to your doctor to learn more.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Kidney infection

    Mayo Clinic
    Kidney infections require prompt medical attention. Talk to your doctor if you experience fever, back/side/groin/abdominal pain, frequent urination, strong urge to urinate, burning sensation when urinating, or pus or blood in your urine.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Finding testicular cancer early

    Canadian Cancer Society
    You may be at higher risk for testicular cancer if you are missing one or both testicles, have a family or personal history of testicular cancer or have Klinefelter syndrome. Learn what is normal for your testicles and see your doctor if you notice any changes.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Sexuality and physical changes with aging: Common physical changes in men

    Health Link B.C.
    Lower testosterone as you age may affect your energy, strength, and sexual function, but having sex is usually possible throughout your life. It may take longer to get an erection.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Saw palmetto and urinary problems

    Berkeley Wellness
    Saw palmetto is an herbal supplement. It does not relieve urinary problems caused by an enlarged prostate. You should always talk to your doctor before taking any herbal supplement.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Finding prostate cancer early

    Canadian Cancer Society
    Talk to your doctor about prostate cancer screening if you have trouble with urination (peeing). Two tests are often used in combination: a digital rectal examination and prostate-specific antigen tests. You may be at higher risk for prostate cancer if you have African ancestry or have a family history of prostate cancer.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Weight loss: Men may have the edge

    Heart and Stroke Foundation
    Men lose weight faster than women. Men build muscle quicker and have higher metabolisms. They also tend to have more confidence about losing weight and do it to improve fitness rather than appearance.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Walking leads to better health for older men

    Center for Advancing Health
    Older men should walk as often as possible for better physical health, mental health and overall quality of life.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Know your prostate

    NHS Choices
    The risk of prostate cancer increases as you age. Get your prostate checked if you need to urinate often, have difficulty or pain when urinating, or have pain during sex.
  • Blog Post

    Erectile dysfunction treatment options

    Erectile dysfunction may be an awkward topic of discussion for some, but it’s a very common condition that affects up to half of all men over the age of 40. Find out what the research says about erectile dysfunction treatment options.
  • Blog Post

    'Plumbing' problems? Ultrasound an easier way to detect bladder obstructions

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (problems urinating) could be caused by an obstruction. The usual procedure for detecting an obstruction is invasive and uncomfortable. Evidence shows a simpler method is just as accurate.
  • Blog Post

    Improved treatments provide relief for men with lower urinary tract symptoms

    It isn’t something we tend to talk about, or even think about, until there’s a problem. Lower urinary tract symptoms are annoying at best and debilitating at worst. New research shows that combination drug treatment can offer improved long-term symptom relief for this common condition.
  • Blog Post

    Screening for prostate cancer: What you should know about the PSA test

    The PSA test is an option for men thinking about being screened for prostate cancer but the harms may outweigh the benefits.

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