+AA
Fr
Back
Public Health Article

Effectiveness of peer support for improving glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials



Review Quality Rating: 9 (strong)

Citation: Qi L, Liu Q, Qi X, Wu N, Tang W, & Xiong H. (2015). Effectiveness of peer support for improving glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. BMC Public Health, 15, 471.

Evidence Summary Article full-text (free) PubMed LinkOut

Abstract

BACKGROUND: To assess the effects of peer support at improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.
METHODS: Relevant electronic databases were sought for this investigation up to Dec 2014. Randomized controlled trials involving patients with type 2 diabetes that evaluated the effect of peer support on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) concentrations were included. The pooled mean differences (MD) between intervention and control groups with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using random-effects model. The Cochrane Collaboration's tool was used to assess the risk of bias.
RESULTS: Thirteen randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. Peer support resulted in a significant reduction in HbA1c (MD -0.57 [95% CI: -0.78 to -0.36]). Programs with moderate or high frequency of contact showed a significant reduction in HbA1c levels (MD -0.52 [95% CI: -0.60 to -0.44] and -0.75 [95% CI: -1.21 to -0.29], respectively), whereas programs with low frequency of contact showed no significant reduction (MD -0.32 [95% CI: -0.74 to 0.09]). The reduction in HbA1c were greater among patients with a baseline HbA1c >/= 8.5% (MD -0.78 [95% CI: -1.06 to -0.51]) and between 7.5 ~ 8.5% (MD -0.76 [95% CI: -1.05 to -0.47]), than patients with HbA1c < 7.5% (MD -0.08 [95% CI: -0.32 to 0.16]).
CONCLUSIONS: Peer support had a significant impact on HbA1c levels among patients with type 2 diabetes. Priority should be given to programs with moderate or high frequency of contact for target patients with poor glycemic control rather than programs with low frequency of contact that target the overall population of patients.


Keywords

Adults (20-59 years), Adult's Health (men's health, women's health), Clinic, Community, Community health centre, Diabetes, Meta-analysis, Senior Health, Seniors (60+ years), Social Support (e.g., counseling, case management, outreach programs)

Register for free access to all Professional content

Register
Want the latest in aging research? Sign up for our email alerts.
Subscribe

Support for the Portal is largely provided by the Labarge Optimal Aging Initiative. AGE-WELL is a contributing partner. Help us to continue to provide direct and easy access to evidence-based information on health and social conditions to help you stay healthy, active and engaged as you grow older. Donate Today.

© 2012 - 2020 McMaster University | 1280 Main Street West | Hamilton, Ontario L8S4L8 | +1 905-525-9140 | Terms Of Use