+AA
Fr
Back
Clinician Article

Factor Xa inhibitors versus vitamin K antagonists for preventing cerebral or systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation.



  • Bruins Slot KM
  • Berge E
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2018 Mar 6;3:CD008980. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD008980.pub3. (Review)
PMID: 29509959
Read abstract Read evidence summary Read full text
Disciplines
  • Cardiology
    Relevance - 7/7
    Newsworthiness - 5/7
  • Family Medicine (FM)/General Practice (GP)
    Relevance - 7/7
    Newsworthiness - 5/7
  • General Internal Medicine-Primary Care(US)
    Relevance - 7/7
    Newsworthiness - 5/7
  • Hemostasis and Thrombosis
    Relevance - 7/7
    Newsworthiness - 5/7
  • Internal Medicine
    Relevance - 6/7
    Newsworthiness - 6/7
  • Hematology
    Relevance - 6/7
    Newsworthiness - 5/7

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Factor Xa inhibitors and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) are now recommended in treatment guidelines for preventing stroke and systemic embolic events in people with atrial fibrillation (AF). This is an update of a Cochrane review previously published in 2013.

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of treatment with factor Xa inhibitors versus VKAs for preventing cerebral or systemic embolic events in people with AF.

SEARCH METHODS: We searched the trials registers of the Cochrane Stroke Group and the Cochrane Heart Group (September 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (August 2017), MEDLINE (1950 to April 2017), and Embase (1980 to April 2017). We also contacted pharmaceutical companies, authors and sponsors of relevant published trials. We used outcome data from marketing authorisation applications of apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban that were submitted to regulatory authorities in Europe and the USA.

SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that directly compared the effects of long-term treatment (lasting more than four weeks) with factor Xa inhibitors versus VKAs for preventing cerebral and systemic embolism in people with AF.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The primary efficacy outcome was the composite endpoint of all strokes and systemic embolic events. Two review authors independently extracted data, and assessed the quality of the trials and the risk of bias. We calculated a weighted estimate of the typical treatment effect across trials using the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) by means of a fixed-effect model. In case of moderate or high heterogeneity of treatment effects, we used a random-effects model to compare the overall treatment effects. We also performed a pre-specified sensitivity analysis excluding any open-label studies.

MAIN RESULTS: We included data from 67,688 participants randomised into 13 RCTs. The included trials directly compared dose-adjusted warfarin with either apixaban, betrixaban, darexaban, edoxaban, idraparinux, idrabiotaparinux, or rivaroxaban. The majority of the included data (approximately 90%) was from apixaban, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban.The composite primary efficacy endpoint of all strokes (both ischaemic and haemorrhagic) and non-central nervous systemic embolic events was reported in all of the included studies. Treatment with a factor Xa inhibitor significantly decreased the number of strokes and systemic embolic events compared with dose-adjusted warfarin in participants with AF (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.97; 13 studies; 67,477 participants; high-quality evidence).Treatment with a factor Xa inhibitor significantly reduced the number of major bleedings compared with warfarin (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.84; 13 studies; 67,396 participants; moderate-quality evidence). There was, however, statistically significant and high heterogeneity (I2 = 83%). When we repeated this analysis using a random-effects model, it did not show a statistically significant decrease in the number of major bleedings (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.17). A pre-specified sensitivity analysis excluding all open-label studies showed that treatment with a factor Xa inhibitor significantly reduced the number of major bleedings compared with warfarin (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.81), but high heterogeneity was also observed in this analysis (I2 = 72%). The same sensitivity analysis using a random-effects model also showed a statistically significant decrease in the number of major bleedings in participants treated with factor Xa inhibitors (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.96).Treatment with a factor Xa inhibitor significantly reduced the risk of intracranial haemorrhages (ICHs) compared with warfarin (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.59; 12 studies; 66,259 participants; high-quality evidence). We observed moderate, but statistically significant heterogeneity (I2 = 55%). The pre-specified sensitivity analysis excluding open-label studies showed that treatment with a factor Xa inhibitor significantly reduced the number of ICHs compared with warfarin (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.56), with low, non-statistically significant heterogeneity (I2 = 27%).Treatment with a factor Xa inhibitor also significantly reduced the number of all-cause deaths compared with warfarin (OR 0.89, 95% 0.83 to 0.95; 10 studies; 65,624 participants; moderate-quality evidence).

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with factor Xa inhibitors significantly reduced the number of strokes and systemic embolic events compared with warfarin in people with AF. The absolute effect of factor Xa inhibitors compared with warfarin treatment was, however, rather small. Factor Xa inhibitors also reduced the number of ICHs, all-cause deaths and major bleedings compared with warfarin, although the evidence for a reduction in the latter is less robust.


Clinical Comments

Cardiology

We should include fewer meta analyses and more original research.

Cardiology

Clinically Xa inhibitors seem to be associated with less bleeding, plausible hypothesis given more constant level of anticoagulation. Glad to see this confirmed by moderately large to large trials.

General Internal Medicine-Primary Care(US)

This article clearly establishes the benefits of factor Xa inhibitors in prevention of cerebrovacular emboli in patients with atrial fibrillation. There are obvious benefits to patients when taking these medications. Hopefully, the many insurance barriers that exist for patients to obtain these medications soon will be improved. This will increase access to these valuable additions to our treatment options for prevention of venous thrombosis and emboli in patients with atrial fibrillation.

General Internal Medicine-Primary Care(US)

This Cochrane review minimizes the reduction in strokes that might be expected with any of the direct Xa inhibitors when compared with dose-adjusted warfarin. I believe the most important summary finding is the reduction in all-cause deaths with the newer agents. I don`t think most patients or their caregivers will make a distinction between ischemic and hemorrhagic events if the patient`s neurologic status is impaired long-term regardless of the cause. I believe these findings may help some clinicians provide more accurate estimates of the incremental benefit of factor Xa inhibitors over dose-adjusted warfarin.

Hemostasis and Thrombosis

This topic is in need of a timely review. The review seems well done but does not have any new conclusions.

Hemostasis and Thrombosis

This Cochrane review provides an updated summary of evidence for the safety and efficacy of oral Xa inhibitors for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Interestingly, the addition of a random effects analysis attenuated the observed benefit vs warfarin for major bleeding (although the benefit for intracranial bleeding remained highly significant).

Register for free access to all Professional content

Register
Want the latest in aging research? Sign up for our email alerts.
Subscribe

Support for the Portal is largely provided by the Labarge Optimal Aging Initiative. AGE-WELL is a contributing partner. Help us to continue to provide direct and easy access to evidence-based information on health and social conditions to help you stay healthy, active and engaged as you grow older. Donate Today.

© 2012 - 2020 McMaster University | 1280 Main Street West | Hamilton, Ontario L8S4L8 | +1 905-525-9140 | Terms Of Use