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Public Health Article

Computerized cognitive training with older adults: A systematic review



Review Quality Rating: 5 (moderate)

Citation: Kueider,A.M., Parisi,J.M., Gross,A.L., & Rebok,G.W. (2012). Computerized cognitive training with older adults: A systematic review. PLoS ONE, 7(7), e40588.

Article full-text (free) PubMed LinkOut

Abstract

A systematic review to examine the efficacy of computer-based cognitive interventions for cognitively healthy older adults was conducted. Studies were included if they met the following criteria: average sample age of at least 55 years at time of training; participants did not have Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment; and the study measured cognitive outcomes as a result of training. Theoretical articles, review articles, and book chapters that did not include original data were excluded. We identified 151 studies published between 1984 and 2011, of which 38 met inclusion criteria and were further classified into three groups by the type of computerized program used: classic cognitive training tasks, neuropsychological software, and video games. Reported pre-post training effect sizes for intervention groups ranged from 0.06 to 6.32 for classic cognitive training interventions, 0.19 to 7.14 for neuropsychological software interventions, and 0.09 to 1.70 for video game interventions. Most studies reported older adults did not need to be technologically savvy in order to successfully complete or benefit from training. Overall, findings are comparable or better than those from reviews of more traditional, paper-and-pencil cognitive training approaches suggesting that computerized training is an effective, less labor intensive alternative.


Keywords

Chronic Diseases, Education / Awareness & Skill Development / Training, Home, Mental Health, Senior Health, Seniors (60+ years)

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