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Testing and treatment decisions (health)

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  • Web Resource Rating

    Should I have ultrasound treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) in my knee?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps adults with osteoarthritis decide on whether or not to have ultrasound therapy by comparing the benefits and side effects of both options.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Should I have ultrasound treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) in my knee?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps adults with osteoarthritis decide on whether or not to have ultrasound therapy by comparing the benefits and side effects of both options.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Osteoarthritis treatment

    UpToDate - patient information
    There are many arthritis treatment options such as rest, weight loss, physical therapy, assistive devices, heat and cold therapies, medications or surgery. Learn about proven and unproven treatments and talk to your doctor about the best treatments options for you.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Prostate cancer: Patient FAQ

    Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
    The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care does not recommend men get screened for prostate cancer with a PSA test because the harms outweigh the benefits. The harms of screening include: false positives, over-diagnosis, infection, erectile dysfunction, urine leakage and biopsy complications.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Prostate cancer - 1000-Person tool

    Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
    The Canadian Task Force on Prevent Health Care does not recommend men get screened for prostate cancer with a PSA test. The potential harms of screening and follow-up treatment do not outweigh the small benefits.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Prostate cancer: Infographic

    Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
    Prostate cancer screening with a PSA test is not recommended because there are more potential harms than benefits.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Breast cancer: Risks and benefits, age 50-69

    Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
    Your risk of dying from breast cancer is slightly reduced if you have regular screening. However, regular screening increase your chance of a false positive result, a biopsy and having part or all of a breast removed unnecessarily.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Type 2 diabetes: Screening for adults

    Health Link B.C.
    People at average risk for type 2 diabetes should be tested every 3 years after age 40. You may need to be tested more frequently if you are at higher risk. Find out your risk with the Canadian Diabetes Risk Assessment Questionnaire (link in this resource).
  • Evidence Summary

    Electronic cigarettes for smoking cessation

    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2016)
  • Evidence Summary

    Behavioural support and pharmacotherapy improve smoking quit rates in adults

    Annals of Internal Medicine (2015)
  • Web Resource Rating

    Cervical cancer: Patient algorithm

    Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
    A Pap test screens for cervical cancer. It recommended that sexually active women under the age of 70 have one every 3 years. Screening is not recommended for those older than 70 if your last 3 Pap tests were negative.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Cervical cancer: Patient FAQ

    Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
    The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recommends women over the age of 25 get a Pap test every three years to screen for cervical cancer. This resource includes information about the Pap test and what an abnormal test result means.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Managing Care for Adults With Long-term Medical Illnesses.

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps adults or an adult you care for with long-term medical illnesses decide whether or not to have case management.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Managing Care for Adults With Long-term Medical Illnesses.

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps adults or an adult you care for with long-term medical illnesses decide whether or not to have case management.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Screening for ovarian cancer: Consumer fact sheet

    U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)
    Women who are not at risk for ovarian cancer should avoid ovarian screening. Ovarian screening can give false-positive results which can lead to unnecessary surgery. Talk to your doctor about your individual risk factors and preferences before making a decision about cancer screening.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Smoking: Helping people stop and stopping them from starting

    Evidently Cochrane
    Medication (such as nicotine replacements) combined with counselling or other support increases your chances of successfully quitting smoking.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Treating pressure ulcers: New evidence, continued uncertainty

    Evidently Cochrane
    Gauze dressings should not be used to treat pressure ulcers (bed sores). Other options include alginate dressings, hydrogel dressings, and negative pressure wound therapy. More evidence is needed about which options are best to improve pain and reduce complications. Research should measure outcomes that matter to patients and carers as well as health professionals.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Peptic ulcers

    Informed Health Online
    Most peptic ulcers are caused by an infection with a type of bacteria called Helicobacter pylori. Use of painkillers, excessive alcohol use and smoking can increase your risk. Common symptoms include abdominal pain, heartburn or nausea. Treatments include lifestyle changes and medications.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Cholesterol and triglycerides tests

    Health Link B.C.
    Cholesterol and triglyceride levels can be measured with blood tests. Too much cholesterol can increase your risk of heart attack or stroke or heart disease.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Chronic tinnitus: What helps - and what doesn't?

    Informed Health Online
    The cause of tinnitus is not known and few treatments have been proven to work. Some research shows that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) could help. This treatment helps you deal with distress caused by the condition.
  • Web Resource Rating

    The antiphospholipid syndrome

    UpToDate - patient information
    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an immune disorder affecting the blood cells which can cause blood clots. Medicines such as anticoagulants (blood thinners) are often prescribed for this condition. Details about symptoms and treatment in this resource.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Carotid endarterectomy for TIA and stroke

    Health Link B.C.
    Carotid endarterectomy surgery aims to reduce risk of stroke for people who have already had one. Ask your doctor if the benefits of this surgery outweigh the risks. Risks include: stroke, heart attack, breathing problems, high blood pressure, infection and nerve injury.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDS)

    UpToDate - patient information
    DMARDs are used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. They work to decrease pain and inflammation and keep the joint working. They can take weeks or months to provide relief. This resource provides details about this medicine.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Managing blood glucose levels on the diabetes rollercoaster: How low should you go?

    Evidently Cochrane
    There is no strong evidence for specific blood glucose targets for managing Type 1 diabetes. Current target guidelines vary between an HbA1c of 6.5% and 6.7% and it is not clear how these guidelines were created. More research is needed on the effects of tight blood sugar control in older populations, and should consider how tight controls may affect patient quality of life.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias)

    Patient.co.uk
    Arrhythmias are abnormal heart beats, some are more serious than others. Your doctor may recommend an electrocardiogram (ECG) test to find the cause and recommend treatment.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Gout

    UpToDate - patient information
    Gout is a painful condition that develops in some people who have high blood levels of urate. This condition can be prevented with anti-inflammatories and by lowering urate with diet changes. The goal of treatment is to reduce pain.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Are long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) effective in adults with poorly controlled asthma?

    Evidently Cochrane
    Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) may help to treat poorly-controlled asthma in adults. More research is needed. Work with your doctor to find a treatment that is best for you.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Breast cancer screening

    Health Link B.C.
    If you are between 50 and 74 years of age, you should have regular mammograms to test for breast cancer every 2-3 years. If you are over the age of 75, talk to your doctor before going for breast cancer screening.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Traditional opioids for chronic non-cancer pain: Untidy, unsatisfactory, and probably unsuitable

    Evidently Cochrane
    Opioids are a type of medicine that can be prescribed by your doctor for chronic pain. Not everyone gets adequate pain relief from opioids and many people can become addicted to this type of medication. Most people should not take opioids for a long time.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Personalised care planning for adults with chronic or long-term health conditions

    Evidently Cochrane
    Participate in personalised care planning by working with your doctor to talk about and decide on the best treatment for you. Research shows this may improve your health.
  • Web Resource Rating

    How well do over-the-counter painkillers work?

    Evidently Cochrane
    Over-the-counter painkiller medications are a simple, inexpensive and effective treatment option for acute pain (such as toothache or sprain). Ibuprofen/paracetamol combinations are especially effective.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Heart Failure

    Patient.co.uk
    Heart failure means that your heart is not working as well as it should. Symptoms of heart failure include running out of breath easily or swollen ankles. Healthy lifestyle choices and medications can help treat heart failure. Details in this resource.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Exercise therapy for knee pain

    Evidently Cochrane
    Exercise might improve knee function and help with pain. Researchers do not yet know which exercises are best.
  • Web Resource Rating

    My treatment, my choice: what do I need to know?

    Evidently Cochrane
    Shared decision-making is when patients and their doctors make choices together considering the best available information and the patient's preferences. This website gives a patient's story of shared decision-making and Graves Disease.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Colorectal cancer test recommendations

    Health Link B.C.
    Colorectal testing every 1-2 years is recommended for people between ages 50 and 74. Your doctor may recommend screening before age 50 and more often if you have an increased risk of this type of cancer (eg. family history of colon cancer, polyps or Crohn's disease).
  • Web Resource Rating

    Rectal Bleeding (blood in faeces)

    Patient.co.uk
    Blood in your faeces (poop) can come from anywhere in the gut. Hemorrhoids are the most common cause of rectal bleeding. If you notice any bleeding or have black faeces, see a doctor. They will perform tests to find the cause.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Bladder cancer treatment; invasive cancer

    UpToDate - patient information
    70% of bladder cancer cases are not invasive. Surgery to remove the bladder is the most common treatment for invasive bladder cancer. This resource provides details, including answers to the common question, "Where will the urine go?"
  • Web Resource Rating

    Bladder cancer treatment; non-muscle invasive (superficial) cancer

    UpToDate - patient information
    Surgery to remove the tumour is the most common treatment for bladder cancer, often followed by chemotherapy. Close follow up by your doctor is important as bladder cancer often comes back.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Early stage breast cancer treatment in postmenopausal women

    UpToDate - patient information
    Breast cancer found early can often be cured. This resource gives information about different breast cancer treatment options for postmenopausal women.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Early stage breast cancer treatment in premenopausal women

    UpToDate - patient information
    Breast cancer found early can often be cured. This resource gives information about different breast cancer treatment options for premenopausal women.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Breast cancer screening: When should I start having mammograms?

    Health Link B.C.
    Use this decision aid to help understand your choices about breast cancer screening, including the risks and benefits of mammograms.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Breast cancer: Patient algorithm

    Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
    The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recommends women between 50 and 74 years old who are not at high risk get screened for breast cancer every 2 to 3 years. Talk to your doctor about screening options if you are at high risk or over 74 years old.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Breast cancer: Patient FAQ

    Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
    This resource includes frequently asked questions about breast cancer, including: Who is considered high risk? What are the harms associated with mammography? and Why is routine screening NOT recommended for women 40-49 years?
  • Web Resource Rating

    Fibromyalgia

    UpToDate - patient information
    Chronic muscle pain and tenderness are symptoms of fibromyalgia. There are medications to help ease symptoms. Also try exercise, relaxation therapy, tai chi, or yoga.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Aspirin and other antiplatelet medicines

    Patient.co.uk
    Low-dose aspirin can help reduce the risk of blood clots, heart attack, stroke and some cancers. Side effects include bleeding in the stomach. Talk to your doctor before deciding to take aspirin regularly.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Can rehabilitation therapy help after slipped disk surgery?

    Informed Health Online
    Exercise programs after back surgery can help improve recovery and might also increase mobility.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Patient.co.uk
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a common problem that can cause bloating, pain, and changes in stools. Eat more soluble fiber and drink water to help relieve symptoms. Also try exercise and stress management. More details and a video in this resource.
  • Evidence Summary

    Non-physician screening and self-screening can detect raised blood pressure

    American Journal of Hypertension (2015)
  • Web Resource Rating

    Adjuvant medical therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer

    UpToDate - patient information
    Women with HER2 positive breast cancer tumours may benefit from chemotherapy and targeted treatment. Read about treatment options here and discuss your options with your doctor.
  • Evidence Summary

    Psychosocial interventions for cannabis use disorder

    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2016)
  • Web Resource Rating

    Sharing decisions about antibiotics

    Evidently Cochrane
    Taking antibiotics when they are not needed can be harmful and lead to antibiotic resistance. Antibiotics do not work for treating uncomplicated viral illnesses, such as the common cold.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Oral cryotherapy: Preventing mouth soreness and ulcers in people having cancer treatments

    Evidently Cochrane
    Oral cryotherapy means keeping the mouth cold with ice, iced water or iced foods. This approach can safely help prevent mouth soreness and ulcers in people having cancer treatments.
  • Web Resource Rating

    How to use a peak flow meter

    UpToDate - patient information
    A peak flow meter measures lung function and the severity of asthma symptoms. It is an inexpensive, easy way to monitor asthma symptoms at home. Regular measurements can help guide treatment. This website gives tips on how to use it.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Pulmonary embolism

    UpToDate - patient information
    Pulmonary embolism occurs when a blood clot leaves a vein and travels to the lung. Treatment includes blood thinners to prevent a new or growing blood clot. This lowers the risk of complications.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Warfarin (Coumadin)

    UpToDate - patient information
    Warfarin is often prescribed for people with high risk of blood clots. Take care to prevent injury and falls while taking this medication and report any abnormal bleeding, bruising or pain to your doctor. More in this resource about foods and medication to avoid while taking warfarin.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDS)

    UpToDate - patient information
    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatories (NSAIDS) help relieve pain and swelling and are some of the most commonly used medicines. NSAIDS may cause complications for people with certain medical conditions or taking certain medications. Read this resource for details and discuss with your doctor.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Rheumatoid arthritis treatment

    UpToDate - patient information
    Rheumatoid arthritis can lead to joint stiffness, pain and swelling. Medications and physical therapy can help improve symptoms. Also try exercise, rest and diet changes. Herbal and nutritional supplements are not recommended.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Osteoporosis prevention and treatment

    UpToDate - patient information
    Osteoporosis causes bones to become thin, weak and brittle. Women are at a higher risk after menopause because of lower levels of estrogen. Prevent osteoporosis with vitamin D, calcium, exercise and not smoking. Some medications can also help.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Which painkillers are best for acute pain after surgery?

    Evidently Cochrane
    Combination painkillers and fast-acting drugs (eg. ibuprofen and paracetamol) can give good pain relief. Serious side effects are rare. Different people react differently to painkillers - even the most effective drugs may not work for you, but another one might.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Multiple myeloma treatment

    UpToDate - patient information
    There has been an improvement in survival of patients with multiple myeloma over the past 30 years. Treatment can include chemotherapy and bone marrow transplant. Treatment recommendations are often related to a person's age - details in this resource.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Why didn't they tell me?

    Evidently Cochrane
    Little high quality information is available about whether hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for women with type 1 diabetes affects management of blood sugar and menopause symptoms. This resource provides one woman's perspective on the issue.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Ischemic stroke treatment (Beyond the Basics)

    UpToDate - patient information
    "Clot busters" (thrombolytic drugs) and aspirin are often used for early treatment of ischemic stroke. Anticoagulants (blood thinners) are seldom recommended. Longer term treatment after a stoke includes eating well and preventing clots, infections, bleeding ulcers and falls.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Acute sinusitis (sinus infection)

    UpToDate - patient information
    Symptoms of sinusitis include blocked nose, nose or face pain and thick, abnormal nose discharge. Get immediate treatment if you have a high fever, severe pain, double vision or swelling around your eyes.
  • Evidence Summary

    Regular geriatric nurse home visits and physician education may increase dementia diagnoses

    International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2015)
  • Web Resource Rating

    Testosterone therapy: Potential benefits and risks as you age

    Mayo Clinic
    Testosterone levels will naturally decline with age. Talk to your doctor if you have a medical condition that affects testosterone. Testosterone therapy has risks and is not recommended as a treatment for normal aging.
  • Web Resource Rating

    What's the evidence on tackling fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis?

    Evidently Cochrane
    Exercise and talking treatments may help people with rheumatoid arthritis manage fatigue. More research is needed to find the best treatments.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Which medications can relieve allergic rhinitis?

    Informed Health Online
    If you have allergic rhinitis, there are medications you can purchase as tablets, nose drops or sprays. These include: antihistamines, steroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, chromones, and decongestants. Research shows these are all effective treatments.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Benign enlarged prostate: Surgery - advantages and disadvantages

    Informed Health Online
    Surgery is not usually needed for benign enlarged prostate. It may be an option, however, if the enlarged prostate is causing urinary tract infections or bladder stones, or if other treatments are not helping. The transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is considered to be the standard surgical approach. There are other variations of TURP, as well as laser treatments and heat therapy. Talk to your doctor to find out what treatment is right for you.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Benefits and risks of screening tests

    Informed Health Online
    Be aware of the benefits and risks of screening tests. Talk to your doctor to find out what kind of screening is right for you.
  • Evidence Summary

    Delayed antibiotics for respiratory infections.

    Cochrane Database Syst Rev (2013)
  • Web Resource Rating

    COPD

    Mayo Clinic
    COPD can cause a cough and makes it difficult to breath. There are many different ways to diagnose and treat COPD. To prevent COPD, do not smoke cigarettes. If you currently smoke, quitting can still help prevent COPD.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Preventive (prophylactic) mastectomy: Surgery to reduce breast cancer risk.

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps women at high risk for breast cancer to decide on whether or not to get preventative (prophylactic) mastectomy by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options. It includes other options for reducing the risk such as medication, breast cancer screening, surgery to remove the ovaries, and healthy lifestyle.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Prophylactic oophorectomy: Preventing cancer by surgically removing your ovaries.

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations decide on whether or not to have a prophylactic oophorectomy by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options. It includes alternative options such as increasing screening for ovarian cancer and birth control pills.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Preventive (prophylactic) mastectomy: Surgery to reduce breast cancer risk.

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps women at high risk for breast cancer to decide on whether or not to get preventative (prophylactic) mastectomy by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options. It includes other options for reducing the risk such as medication, breast cancer screening, surgery to remove the ovaries, and healthy lifestyle.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Prophylactic oophorectomy: Preventing cancer by surgically removing your ovaries.

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations decide on whether or not to have a prophylactic oophorectomy by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options. It includes alternative options such as increasing screening for ovarian cancer and birth control pills.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Several non-invasive treatments work for neck pain

    Institute for Work & Health
    Educational videos, exercise, and neck mobilization were more beneficial for treating neck pain or whip lash than ultrasound or electrical stimulation. Laser therapy, exercise and massage or acupuncture may help with chronic pain. Hard or soft collars did not work.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Some herbal drugs may ease back pain in short term

    Institute for Work & Health
    Some alternative herbal medicines may help to relieve back pain. Devil's Claw, Willow Bark and cayenne may help reduce pain in the short term. However, there is no evidence that these substances are safe or useful in the long-term.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Herbs and phytoestrogens

    National Women’s Health Network
    Natural alternatives to hormone therapy such as phytoestrogens and herbs are sometimes used to treat menopause symptoms, but not all are safe and some may be harmful. More research is needed.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Menopause hormone therapy and ovarian cancer

    National Women’s Health Network
    Hormone therapy can treat menopause symptoms but may also increase your risk of cancer. It does not decrease risk of heart disease. Consider your medical history, preferences, and concerns when deciding if you will use hormone therapy.
  • Web Resource Rating

    "What matters most to you?" How decision aids help patients make better choices

    Evidently Cochrane
    Decision aids can help patients choose between different healthcare options. Decision aids can improve people's knowledge about treatment options and help them feel clearer about their health priorities.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Colon polyps

    Mayo Clinic
    Signs of colon polyps include abdominal pain, blood in stool or a change in bathroom habits. It is important to get screened if you are at risk since some polyps can develop into colon cancer. Many polyps can be removed during screening.
  • Web Resource Rating

    GERD: Treatments and drugs

    Mayo Clinic
    Heartburn is a symptom of GERD. Treatments include lifestyle changes, medicine and surgery. This resource includes tips for lifestyle changes, including elevating your bed, avoiding certain foods and eating smaller meals. If lifestyle changes do not work, your doctor may recommend medication. Serious cases may require surgery.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Treatment options for GERD

    Informed Health Online
    Symptoms of GERD are heartburn and regurgitation. To treat symptoms, try changing your diet and avoid eating in the evening. Medications and surgery can help, but increase the risk of side effects or serious complications.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma in adults

    UpToDate - patient information
    DLBCL is a cancer of the lymphocytes. It is more common in women and older adults. You may be treated with chemotherapy and immunotherapy. This resource provides detailed information about the disease.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Follicular lymphoma in adults

    UpToDate - patient information
    Follicular lymphoma is a cancer of the white blood cells. Older adults, women, and certain ethnicities are at a higher risk. Symptoms include swelling in your lymph nodes like the neck, armpit and groin. If you find swelling, ask your doctor about screening.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Hemorrhagic stroke treatment

    UpToDate - patient information
    A stroke can damage the brain. A surgical procedure may be recommended to prevent or stop bleeding or reduce the pressure inside the skull. It is important to get medical help right away to limit complications. Details in this resource.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Primary low-grade glioma in adults

    UpToDate - patient information
    Primary brain tumours are cancers that develop in the brain. Symptoms can include seizures, headaches and difficulty concentrating. Treatment includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Detailed information about gliomas in this resource.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Bladder control problems: Medications for treating urinary incontinence

    Mayo Clinic
    Some medications (detailed in this resource) can help bladder control problems and urinary incontinence. Talk to your doctor to see which medication is right for you, and to learn about possible side effects.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Study questions proposed blood pressure guidelines in people 60 and older

    American Heart Association
    One study recommends that people age 60+ start treatment for high blood pressure when their blood pressure is 150/90. This is different than the current recommendation to start treatment at 140/90. Talk to your doctor about the best time to for you to start blood pressure treatment.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Osteoporosis treatment: Medications can help

    Mayo Clinic
    Bisphosphonates are commonly prescribed to treat osteoporosis. They slow bone breakdown and lower your risk of breaking bones. Side effects may include heart burn and upset stomach. Talk to your doctor to find the right type of bisphosphonates for you. Exercising, eating well and avoiding alcohol and tobacco can also help treat osteoporosis.
  • Web Resource Rating

    How could you live better with type 2 diabetes?

    WebMD
    Use this diagnostic tool to find out how well you (or a loved one) are living with diabetes.
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    Do healthy women need annual pelvic exams?

    Our Bodies, Ourselves
    A new guideline suggests that most healthy women do not need a pelvic exam every year. If you are pregnant or have symptoms (eg. pain), you may need more frequent pelvic exams. Decisions about having a pelvic exam should consider a woman's needs and preferences.
  • Web Resource Rating

    DHEA: Evidence for anti-aging claims is weak

    Mayo Clinic
    Levels of the hormone DHEA decrease as your age, causing symptoms such as lower muscle mass, bone density and cognitive impairment. However, DHEA supplements do not seem to slow aging and may increase your risk of certain cancers and other health problems. More research is needed.
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    What are the benefits and risks of long-term hormone therapy?

    Informed Health Online
    The evidence recommends that you do not use long-term hormone therapy to treat symptoms of menopause. Hormone therapy may reduce your risk of bone fractures but it can also increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, heart attack, breast cancer and gallbladder problems.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Relieving menopause symptoms on your own

    Informed Health Online
    There is no conclusive research about how diet choices, exercise, relaxation techniques, herbal supplements or alternative therapies affect menopause symptoms. Use caution if you try herbal supplements and alternative therapies to treat menopause symptoms; some of these can have serious side effects.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Breast Cancer: What Should I Do if I'm at High Risk?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps women at high risk for breast cancer to decide what to do. It outlines options such as getting extra checkups and testing, take medicine, have surgery to remove both breasts and have surgery to remove your ovaries and compares the benefits, risks, and side effects of each option.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Hormone therapy: Is it right for you?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps women experiencing natural (nonsurgical) menopause decide on whether or not to get hormone therapy by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Breast Cancer: What Should I Do if I'm at High Risk?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps women at high risk for breast cancer to decide what to do. It outlines options such as getting extra checkups and testing, take medicine, have surgery to remove both breasts and have surgery to remove your ovaries and compares the benefits, risks, and side effects of each option.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Hormone therapy: Is it right for you?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps women experiencing natural (nonsurgical) menopause decide on whether or not to get hormone therapy by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Arthritis: Should I have hip replacement surgery?

    OHRI
    Hip replacement surgery is usually only recommended for people who are unable to control their pain with other treatments. Risks include need for repeat surgery or joint infections. This decision tool includes questions to discuss with your doctor.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Arthritis: Should I have knee replacement surgery?

    OHRI
    Knee replacement surgery is usually only recommended for people who are unable to control their pain with other treatments. Risks include blood clots, unstable joints and a dislocated kneecap. This resource includes frequently asked questions to help you make a decision about knee replacement.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Arthritis: Should I have hip replacement surgery?

    OHRI
    Hip replacement surgery is usually only recommended for people who are unable to control their pain with other treatments. Risks include need for repeat surgery or joint infections. This decision tool includes questions to discuss with your doctor.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Arthritis: Should I have knee replacement surgery?

    OHRI
    Knee replacement surgery is usually only recommended for people who are unable to control their pain with other treatments. Risks include blood clots, unstable joints and a dislocated kneecap. This resource includes frequently asked questions to help you make a decision about knee replacement.
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    Psuedogout

    UpToDate - patient information
    Pseudogout is a form of arthritis that causes sudden attacks of joint pain and swelling. Treatment includes anti-inflammatory medication and episodes can be prevented with daily colchicine.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Chronic kidney disease

    Health Link B.C.
    Diabetes and high blood pressure are the two main causes of chronic kidney disease. Changes in how much you urinate, fatigue, sleep problems and nausea are all signs of loss of kidney function. Avoid long term use of medications that may damage your kidneys, exercise regularly and eat a diet low in protein, sodium and fat to reduce your risk of kidney disease.
  • Web Resource Rating

    What are probiotics?

    Mayo Clinic
    Probiotics are good bacteria that help keep your digestive system healthy. They are available supplements and certain foods. Details in this resource about when to avoid taking probiotics, and considerations to ask your doctor.
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    Do I need to include probiotics and prebiotics in my diet?

    Mayo Clinic
    Probiotics may help to keep your digestive system healthy. Prebiotics act as food for probiotics. There is some evidence that probiotics may help treat diarrhea, yeast infections and irritable bowel syndrome. More research is needed on the role that probiotics and prebiotics play in digestive health.
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    Stroke treatment

    Mayo Clinic
    Treatment for a stroke depends on whether it is an ischemic or a hemorrhagic stroke. An ischemic stroke is caused by a blood clot and treated with clot-busting medication. A hemorrhagic stroke is caused by bleeding in your brain and treated with a surgical procedure. After a stroke, your doctor will usually recommend rehabilitation to help speed your recovery.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Stroke rehabilitation

    Health Link B.C.
    Rehabilitation after stroke can help you relearn any skills lost as a result of the stroke. It is important to start rehabilitation as soon as possible after a stroke. This resource provides details about rehabilitation, including frequently asked questions.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Chronic kidney disease

    Mayo Clinic
    Chronic kidney disease results in a slow loss of kidney function. Treatment is meant to slow down this process. You may not notice symptoms until the disease is advanced. Complications include high blood pressure, anemia and retaining fluids.
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    Acute kidney failure

    Mayo Clinic
    In acute kidney failure, your kidneys stop working over a few hours or days. You may notice swelling and decreased amount of urine. It is most common among people who are critically ill, although otherwise healthy people can recover.
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    Peptic ulcer: Treatment

    Mayo Clinic
    Treatment depends on the underlying cause of your peptic ulcer. If tests show that you have an H. pylori infection, your doctor may recommend a combination of antibiotics and medication to help reduce stomach acid. Otherwise, acid blockers may be prescribed to reduce stomach acid and ulcer pain. If your ulcer does not heal, your doctor may recommend more tests to find another possible cause of your symptoms.
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    Liver disease

    Mayo Clinic
    There are many types of liver disease, which can be caused by genetics, viruses, obesity and alcohol abuse. Abdominal pain, a yellowing of the skin or eyes and chronic fatigue are all signs of liver disease. If left untreated, the damage to your organ can lead to liver failure. Speak to your doctor if you experience any of the symptoms of liver disease.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Rx for Change: Diabetic neuropathy

    National Women’s Health Network
    Symptoms of diabetic neuropathy (nerve pain) range from numbness to severe pain. Some evidence suggests alternative treatments may help with pain such as exercise, capsaicin skin cream or dietary supplements such as alpha-lipoic acid, vitamin B12 and vitamin D.
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    Breast cancer guide to diagnosis and treatment

    UpToDate - patient information
    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer in the US. The death rate has declined, partly due to increased screening and improved treatment. When found and treated early it is often curable. This website gives information about diagnosing and treating breast cancer.
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    Making sense of the menopause: Experience, evidence and you

    Evidently Cochrane
    Access to support and reliable information about menopause can help women prepare for this time in their lives. This resource provides links to interviews and blogs in which women share their personal experiences.
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    Septic arthritis

    Mayo Clinic
    Septic arthritis is a painful infection in a joint (usually the knee or hip) and is more common in older adults. Doctors use joint drainage and antibiotics to treat septic arthritis.
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    The inconvenient truth of vaccine refusal

    Harvard Health Letter
    Vaccines have risks and side effects. However, you are more likely to catch a disease or illness if you are not vaccinated against it. More outbreaks occur when more people choose not to vaccinate, and people are often contagious before they realize they are sick.
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    Shoulder osteoarthritis treatment

    UpToDate - patient information
    This resource discusses ways to treat and prevent arthritis of the shoulder. Avoid putting strain on the joint; for example, put that arm in your shirt or coat first when getting dressed. Try applying heat, stretching, shoulder exercises and nonprescription pain relievers to help ease pain. Details in this resource.
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    Genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer

    UpToDate - patient information
    A family history of breast or ovarian cancer can increase your risk of getting the disease. Consider genetic counseling and testing if you are at high risk. Women with BRCA gene mutations are often advised to have more frequent cancer screening.
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    Benefits and risks of opioids in arthritis management

    Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center
    Morphine and similar drugs may be helpful if you suffer from disabling pain. However, opioids can lead to dependence and addiction. The goal is to treat chronic pain with the lowest dose of opiates to avoid such problems.
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    Palliative care: Who is it for?

    Mayo Clinic
    Palliative care focuses on providing relief from symptoms and stress you may experience during treatment for a serious illness. Read more to learn about whether or not palliative care may be right for you.
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    Medicines for dementia

    Patient.co.uk
    Certain medication may improve thinking and memory for people with dementia. Other drug treatments can help with related symptoms, such as depression, sleeping problems and agitation. Details about these medications in this resource.
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    Can we improve how well people take their medicine?

    Evidence-based Living
    Many people do not take their medication as prescribed by their health care provider. There are many ways to encourage people to take their medication, including encouragement by health providers, family and friends, but these do not always lead to improvements. More research is needed on this topic.
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    How to remind people to take their medicine

    Evidence-based Living
    Research shows that if you receive text message reminders to take your medicine, you might be less likely to miss a dose. Weekly messages may work better than daily messages. More research is needed.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Managing medication for long-term conditions

    Informed Health Online
    It can be difficult to keep track of all of your medications, particularly if you are taking multiple prescriptions. Any medication is dangerous if not taken properly. Keep your schedule simple, put your pills in easy-to-use packages, and set reminders to help you better manage your long-term medication. Talk to your doctor if you have questions or concerns about your medication.
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    Chronic pain: In depth

    National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health
    Chronic pain is mild to severe pain that lasts longer than six months. Some alternative approaches (acupuncture, yoga, herbal supplements), used in addition to conventional medicine, may help people manage chronic pain. Speak with your doctor before you begin any alternative health approach to make sure it is safe for you.
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    Can text messaging improve medication adherence in adults with coronary heart disease?

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    A new study shows that mobile phones may help improve care for people with coronary heart disease. People who received text message reminders to take their medication were more likely to do so.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Treatment of periodontitis: Cleaning, scaling, care

    Informed Health Online
    Periodontitis can cause your teeth to fall out. To avoid periodontitis, develop a daily dental care routine, stop smoking and get your teeth cleaned professionally. Talk to your dentist about other treatment options like deep scaling or surgery.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Mitral valve regurgitation: Repair or replace the valve?

    Health Link B.C.
    You may need surgery to treat mitral valve regurgitation. Surgery options include repairing the valve or replacing with an artificial valve. Speak with your doctor to determine which surgery may be right for you.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Mitral valve stenosis

    Health Link B.C.
    Mitral stenosis is a heart disease caused by the narrowing of a heart valve which stops it from opening properly. Symptoms include shortness of breath, fatigue, weakness, and pounding heart. If left untreated, mitral valve stenosis may cause serious heart damage.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Mitral valve replacement surgery

    Health Link B.C.
    Mitral valve replacement is done by open-heart surgery to treat heart valve problems such as mitral valve regurgitation or mitral valve stenosis. Depending on the cause of your condition and how severe it is, your doctor may recommend this surgery. Details about risks and benefits of this surgery in this resource.
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    Heart valve replacement surgery

    Health Link B.C.
    Heart valve replacement surgery is performed to repair or replace a valve that is not working properly. In most cases, a surgeon will operate to remove the damaged valve and replace it with a new one. This is a common type of surgery with a low risk of complications.
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    Aortic valve regurgitation

    Health Link B.C.
    Aortic valve regurgitation is a heart disease caused when your heart valve does not close properly allowing backflow of blood. Symptoms include chest pain, a rapid heart beat and lightheadedness. Medication or surgery are common treatments. If left untreated, aortic valve regurgitation can lead to heart failure.
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    Hearing aids: How to choose the right one

    Mayo Clinic
    There are many different types of hearing aids available. They may fit behind the ear, in the ear, or are an open fit. Details in this resource including pictures of different options. Ask for a trial period before you buy.
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    Canalith repositioning

    Mayo Clinic
    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a problem in the inner ear that can cause you to feel dizzy. Canalith repositioning can help with BPPV. This resource includes pictures of how to do this manoeuver.
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    Epley maneuver

    Medline Plus
    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a problem in the inner ear that can cause you to feel dizzy. The Epley manoeuver - done by a health professional - can help with BPPV.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Does cognitive behavioral therapy help people to cope better with tinnitus?

    Informed Health Online
    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) may help you cope with tinnitus in everyday life and help reduce symptoms of depression. It is important to remember that this kind of treatment requires patience and motivation.
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    Can specialized support improve the use of CPAP therapy?

    Informed Health Online
    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is a common treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. Some people who use a CPAP machine find the mask uncomfortable, have trouble falling asleep or get a dry mouth. Support from sleep specialists and training courses can increase CPAP use.
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    Hearing loss

    Mayo Clinic
    It is common to have gradual hearing loss with age. Being around loud noise and a family history of hearing loss increases your risk. Removing ear wax, surgery and hearing aids are common treatments, depending on the cause of hearing loss.
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    Can intracranial stents help prevent strokes?

    Informed Health Online
    Intracranial stents are designed to keep the blood vessels open and prevent strokes. Stents can actually increase the risk of stroke for people who have had a stroke. The most common way to prevent stroke is to use medication.
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    Slide show: Age-related vision problems

    Mayo Clinic
    Recognize signs of eye floaters, cataracts, glaucoma, and macular degeneration which can occur with age. Speak with your doctor about changes in your eyesight. Some problems can be prevented or treated.
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    Eye exam

    Mayo Clinic
    An eye exam is a series of tests performed by an ophthalmologist or optometrist to check your general eye health. Your age, health and risk of developing eye diseases affect how frequently you will need an eye exam. If you wear glasses or contact lenses or if you have a family history of eye disease you will need to have your eyes checked more often.
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    Former smokers and lung cancer

    Berkeley Wellness
    Low dose CT scans may help find early signs of lung cancer in people who are at high risk of developing the disease. If you are between 55 to 80 and have a history of smoking, speak to your doctor about medical tests used to diagnose lung cancer.
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    Cataracts pictures, causes, symptoms and surgery

    Medicine Net
    Lower your risk of cataracts by not smoking, limiting alcohol, controlling diabetes and wearing sunglasses. Eyeglasses or contact lenses can help correct vision. Cataract surgery is a safe and effective treatment. Pictures in this slideshow.
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    How effective are cholinesterase inhibitors?

    Informed Health Online
    Cholinesterase inhibitors are medications that may help to slow the loss of mental abilities for people with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. Side effects include nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, dizziness or diarrhea. It is unclear if these medications work better or worse than other Alzheimer's treatments.
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    Medication for COPD

    Informed Health Online
    Medications for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease help with symptoms. Some of the medicines prescribed to help with breathing are bronchodilators, steroids and anti-inflammatories. Details about medication options for COPD in this resource.
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    Significance of negative penicillin allergy skin testing

    UpToDate - patient information
    A penicillin skin test is used to see if a person is allergic to penicillin. Negative results mean there is no allergy. Allergic reactions to penicillin can include fever, muscle pain and even death.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Detecting dementia: How hit and miss is this questionnaire?

    Evidently Cochrane
    The IQCODE questionnaire can be used to find out whether you have a memory disorder. The test can lead to false dementia diagnosis for healthy patients. A single tool is likely not the best approach for diagnosing dementia.
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    Hay fever and dust mite allergies: Allergen-specific immunotherapy

    Informed Health Online
    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is designed to reduce allergy symptoms in the medium to long term by repeatedly exposing the person to an allergy extract over a long period of time. Research has shown it is effective for treating hay fever and year-round (perennial) allergic rhinitis. Talk with your doctor to see if allergen-specific immunotherapy is right for you.
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    Asthma treatment in adolescents and adults

    UpToDate - patient information
    Identifying and avoiding triggers of your asthma is important. This website gives a list of asthma treatments, side effects, and how to treat an asthma attack. Visit your healthcare provider to discuss an effective treatment plan.
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    Blood donation and transfusion

    UpToDate - patient information
    If you choose to donate blood, you will first be asked about your medical history, age and weight. Vital signs and a blood test will be done. Currently, the risk of getting an infection from blood donation is very low.
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    I've been taking prednisone for my rheumatoid arthritis, but I've heard that it can increase my chances of developing osteoporosis. How big is the risk?

    Mayo Clinic
    Your risk of developing osteoporosis is higher if you take prednisone. To limit the risk of osteoporosis while on this medication, try weight bearing exercises and avoid alcohol and tobacco. Calcium and vitamin D supplements may help lower your risk.
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    Top ten things to know: Decision making in advanced heart failure

    American Heart Association
    It is important that doctors and patients work together to make decisions about advanced heart failure. Developing an end-of-life care plan that meets your values, goals and preferences will help to simplify decisions later on.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Medicines to prevent abnormal heart rhythm in heart failure

    Health Link B.C.
    Abnormal heart rhythms can be dangerous. Your doctor might prescribe medicine to treat this condition, such as beta-blockers or amiodarone. Details about these medicines in this resource.
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    Which rosacea medications are proven to be effective?

    Informed Health Online
    There is no cure for rosacea but certain treatments can reduce symptoms. Creams containing azelaic acid or the antibiotic metronidazole may help with your symptoms.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Echinacea: Is it effective for the common cold?

    Mayo Clinic
    There is little evidence that taking echinacea will help you get over a cold faster or reduce cold symptoms. If you take other medications, talk to your doctor before taking echinacea.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Supplements for diabetes? Wishful thinking

    Berkeley Wellness
    Dietary supplements are unlikely to help treat diabetes and some may be harmful. Chromium, ginseng and cinnamon are somewhat promising options but further study is needed. Discuss any medications or herbal supplements with your doctor before taking them.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Treating acute sinusitis

    Informed Health Online
    Acute sinusitis is most often caused by the common cold and can last up to a few weeks. Symptoms include a blocked or runny nose, severe facial pain and a high fever. Treatment options include nasal sprays and antibiotics.
  • Web Resource Rating

    What we know about cardiac rehab

    Evidence-based Living
    Cardiac rehabilitation is a therapy that includes exercise, education, and support to help you make choices that will improve your heart health. This therapy can help lower your chance of going to the hospital.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Rosacea

    Informed Health Online
    Rosacea is a skin condition that causes red patches on your face. Treatments include antibiotics or medicated gels, creams and lotions. Avoiding things that trigger your rosacea can help prevent it.
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    Parkinson's: Non-drug treatment

    Informed Health Online
    Exercise and speech therapy can help relieve symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in addition to medication. These therapies aim to improve patients’ movement, speech, mental health and independence in daily life.
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    Food allergy treatment and avoidance

    UpToDate - patient information
    Food allergies can cause serious or even life-threatening reactions. Adults and parents of kids with food allergies can learn how to read food labels to avoid eating these foods. Read this resource for other tips to avoid allergic reactions from food.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Can lavage and debridgement help with osteoarthritis of the knee?

    Informed Health Online
    Studies have shown that therapeutic arthroscopy - surgery to clean and smooth the knee joint - will not help lower your pain, fix knee problems or improve your quality of life.
  • Web Resource Rating

    What treatment options are there for warts?

    Informed Health Online
    Warts are almost always harmless and usually disappear on their own in time. Common treatments include salicyclic acid and cryotherapy (freezing the warts).
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    LASIK surgery: Is it right for you?

    Mayo Clinic
    LASIK surgery can help correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. Risks include dry eyes, vision disturbance and problems healing. Before surgery, talk with your eye doctor about risks and benefits of treatment options (details in this resource).
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    Irritable bowel syndrome: What helps and what doesn't?

    Informed Health Online
    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is often difficult to treat. Treatments include: soluble fiber (eg. psyllium), peppermint oil capsules, probiotics, anti-cramping medications, medications for diarrhea/constipation, antibiotics, antidepressants and acupuncture. All have varying rates of success and side effects.
  • Web Resource Rating

    The evidence on arthroscopic knee surgery

    Evidence-based Living
    Arthroscopic knee surgery involves small incisions to remove damaged tissue. This procedure helps provide short term pain relief, but not long term benefits and there are risks involved. Researchers do not recommend it for middle aged or older adults.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Take a look: Avoiding unnecessary surgery in pancreatic cancer

    Evidently Cochrane
    If CT scan results show possible cancer in your pancreas, speak with your doctor about laparoscopy to help with diagnosis. Laparoscopy can lower the risk of unnecessary surgery.
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    Over-the-counter treatments: Do we know what works?

    Evidently Cochrane
    There is no reliable evidence that muscle rub creams ease pain, or that cough medicines are helpful for coughs. Honey may be a better choice for coughs. Over-the-counter cold medications may help relieve symptoms, but have side effects. Ask your pharmacist for their advice.
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    Acupuncture for itchiness: An evidence-based solution

    Evidence-based Living
    There is some evidence showing that acupuncture helps relieve itchiness. More research is needed. If you suffer from itchiness it may be worth giving a try.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Can sentinel node assessment help women with vulval cancer avoid unnecessary surgery?

    Evidently Cochrane
    Women with vulval cancer and groin metastases may require surgery. A type of test called a sentinel node assessment can lower the need for surgery by 70%. Speak with your doctor about your options.
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    Hormone therapy: will it help or harm your heart?

    Evidently Cochrane
    Hormone therapy treatment does little to prevent heart disease in post-menopausal women, although the benefits might be greater for women who start sooner after menopause. It does increase risk of stroke. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of this treatment option.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Pain and injury survival tips

    SaveYourself.ca
    Over 50 self-treatment tips for relief of common pain problems and injuries, including strength training, icing, swimming and stress relief.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment in adults

    UpToDate - patient information
    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a blood cancer. Chemotherapy is a common treatment - side effects include hair loss, vomiting, and infection. More information related to treatment and specific medications for ALL is available in this resource.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment in adults

    UpToDate - patient information
    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Common treatments are chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation. AML in older adults can be more difficult to treat.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Hormone therapy for the menopause after endometriosis surgery - friend or foe?

    Evidently Cochrane
    There is not enough research to deny hormone therapy to women who have had their ovaries removed. However, there is also no evidence that hormone therapy helps decrease pain or lower the risk of more surgery. More research is needed.
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    Should you be tested for diabetes?

    Berkeley Wellness
    Get tested for diabetes if you are over 45 years old. People who are overweight, have high blood pressure, a family history of diabetes or other risk factors should get tested earlier. Early detection of diabetes may help you avoid using medication.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Men's health: Prevent the top threats

    Mayo Clinic
    Many of the leading causes of death among men (heart disease, stroke, cancer and respiratory disease) can be prevented. A healthy diet, staying physically active, quitting smoking and limiting alcohol, managing stress and getting recommended health screenings will all help improve your health.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Relief for a stuffy nose, cough and sore throat

    Informed Health Online
    There are no treatments that fight common cold viruses directly. Painkillers, nasal sprays, steam inhalation or vitamin C may help relieve symptoms but the benefits of many treatments are not well studied or have no proven benefit. Antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infections.
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    How long must I take bisphosphonates for osteoporosis? Are they a lifelong commitment?

    Mayo Clinic
    Bisphosphonates are normally taken for 3 to 5 years. Side effects may include stomach upset, jawbone problems and thighbone fractures. If after 5 years you still have a high risk of fractures, your doctor may recommend you continue to take bisphosphonates or another osteoporosis medication.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Can antibiotics prevent cellulitis from coming back?

    Informed Health Online
    A low-dose of penicillin every day for up to a year may prevent cellulitis from recurring, with few side effects. It is important, however, to use the penicillin properly to prevent bacterial resistance.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Can acute sinusitis be treated with antibiotics?

    Informed Health Online
    Acute sinusitis (sinus inflammation) does not usually respond to antibiotics. Symptoms often improve after 1-2 weeks. If your symptoms last longer, see your doctor. More details in this resource.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Acute gout attacks: Pain relief

    Informed Health Online
    Some medications can relieve symptoms of acute gout attacks, including anti-inflammatory painkillers, cochicine and corticosteroids. Some have more serious side effects.
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    Parkinson disease treatment options - Education, support, and therapy

    UpToDate - patient information
    Parkinson disease is a movement disorder. Medication, education, exercise (such as Tai Chi, swimming, walking), physical and speech therapy, and diet changes may help ease or manage symptoms. Details in this resource.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Multiple myeloma symptoms, diagnosis, and staging

    UpToDate - patient information
    Multiple myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Growth of these cells leads to bone pain, fractures and other complications. Blood and bone marrow tests are used for diagnosis.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Rehabilitation of older adult patients with arthritis

    Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center
    Wheelchairs, walkers, canes and crutches help adults with arthritis keep mobile. This resource includes details about other devices, therapies, rehabilitation and health professionals to help you choose the support you need.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Rehabilitation management for rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center
    Exercise, heat/cold therapy, electrical stimulation and the use of braces and adaptive equipment can improve fitness, well-being and activities of daily living for people with rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Testosterone therapy: Potential benefits and risks as you age

    Mayo Clinic
    Testosterone therapy can increase risk of sleep problems, blood clots, enlarged breasts and more. Talk to your doctor about the risk and benefits if considering this type of hormone therapy.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Drug therapy for wet AMD

    Informed Health Online
    There are several drugs that can help prevent or slow vision loss for people wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but there is no cure. The drug Lucentis has been shown to delay vision loss in around 30 out of 100 people.
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    Imported fire ants

    UpToDate - patient information
    Fire ants can sting and cause an allergic reaction. Kill the ant and wash the sting site with soap and cool water. Antihistamines can help reduce itching. Get emergency treatment if you show signs of anaphylaxis (trouble breathing or swallowing, fainting).
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    Choosing wisely: When less is more in health care

    Evidently Cochrane
    The "more is better" mentality about treatment and testing can do more harm than good. Learn how to effectively communicate with health professionals about your healthcare and make informed decisions. Music video on the topic included.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Does ultrasound speed the healing of broken bones?

    Institute for Work & Health
    A recent review showed that ultrasound may help heal broken bones. However, the quality of the evidence included in the review was low and more research is needed.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Stomach (gastric) cancer

    Patient.co.uk
    Treatment can often slow the progress of stomach cancer, and the earlier it is diagnosed, the better. Discuss treatment options with a specialist who knows your case.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Making choices about living with motor neurone disease

    Evidently Cochrane
    ALS is the most common type of Motor Neurone Disease (MND). Supported breathing with mechanical ventilation can help to improve or maintain quality of life for people with MND/ALS. More research is needed about tube feeding, saliva and pain management.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Migraine, art and medicine

    Evidently Cochrane
    Different types of drugs used to treat or prevent migraine headaches include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), triptans and anti-epileptic drugs. This resource highlights research studies measuring which are most effective.
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    Managing asthma: How does taking inhaled corticosteroids only when symptoms get worse compare with daily use

    Evidently Cochrane
    There does not appear to be a difference in asthma flare ups or negative health events whether you use an inhaler (with corticosteroids) everyday or only when you have symptoms.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Treating migraine attacks: New evidence to guide choices

    Evidently Cochrane
    Sumatriptan and Zolmitriptan medications can help relieve migraine symptoms. They both offer pain relief and the side effects from both these drugs are generally mild.
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    Alternative cancer treatments: 11 options to consider

    Mayo Clinic
    Alternative cancer treatments such as exercise, yoga, acupuncture, aromatherapy, massage therapy, hypnosis, music therapy, and meditation may offer relief from your symptoms. They may help with anxiety, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, pain, difficulty sleeping, and stress.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Hormone therapy for menopause symptoms

    Informed Health Online
    Hormone therapy for menopause can help in the short-term to treat menopause symptoms like hot flashes and sweats. Long-term hormone therapy is not recommended because of serious side-effects like increased risk of blood clots, stroke and breast cancer.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Enlarged hemorrhoids: How can you reduce the symptoms yourself?

    Informed Health Online
    Reduce the symptoms of enlarged hemorrhoids. Prevent constipation, relax and take your time on the toilet. Try a warm bath, ointment or a suppository.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Type 2 diabetes: Does self-monitoring blood sugar have an advantage for people who are not taking insulin?

    Informed Health Online
    People with Type 2 diabetes who do not take insulin can monitor their blood sugar levels at home. More research is needed to find out if self-monitoring of blood sugar helps prevent diabetes-related illnesses or hypoglycemia.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Psoriasis

    Informed Health Online
    Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin disease that is not contagious. Symptoms include red patches, scaly skin and itchy skin. Creams, bathing, UV light therapy or medications can help.
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    What surgical procedures are used to treat hemorrhoids?

    Informed Health Online
    Talk to your doctor about other options for severe enlarged hemorrhoids if treating the symptoms does not give you relief. Treatment options include sclerotherapy, rubber ban ligation (banding), hemorrhoid removal and stapling.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Alzheimer's Disease: Does memantine help?

    Informed Health Online
    Studies suggest medications containing memantine can help to slow the loss of activities of daily life and mental ability (memory, learning). More research is needed to know whether memantine works better or worse than other Alzheimer's treatments.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Laser therapy evidence unclear for low-back pain

    Institute for Work & Health
    Studies show low-level laser therapy may help to lower back pain, but the effects were small and the reviewers do not recommend choosing this therapy over other beneficial treatments.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Is traction effective in treating low-back pain?

    Institute for Work & Health
    Traction does not appear to be a useful treatment for lower back pain.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Occupational therapy for stroke: What is it and how can it help?

    Evidently Cochrane
    Occupational therapy can help people recover better and be more independent after a stroke. More research is needed on the specific benefits of occupational therapy.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Breast cancer: Your treatment, your choice

    Evidently Cochrane
    Treatment options for breast cancer include medications, chemotherapy and surgery. Recent evidence shows the drug trastuzumab (Herceptin®) can reduce cancer progression by more than one third. Speak with your doctor about treatment options, talk to other patients about their experiences, understand the latest evidence on breast cancer treatments and use a decision aid (links in this resource).
  • Web Resource Rating

    Gout is no fun: Can dietary supplements help?

    Evidently Cochrane
    There is no good evidence to show that dietary supplements can help chronic gout. Enriched skim milk may help reduce pain from gout.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Adults with acute asthma: Can intravenous magnesium sulfate help?

    Evidently Cochrane
    Intravenous magnesium sulfate may improve lung function and reduce the number of hospital admissions for adults with asthma. More research on this treatment is needed.
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    Obesity: Waist size matters

    Harvard School of Public Health
    Abdominal obesity can lead to health problems such as diabetes and heart disease. Two ways to measure abdominal fat are waist circumference (easy to measure and interpret) and waist-to-hip ratio.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Flu, chills and other ills: A wintry round-up of Cochrane evidence

    Evidently Cochrane
    A recent review update found that there is no evidence that antibiotics are beneficial for adults with colds or flu and can cause more harm than good. Another review found that patients undergoing chemotherapy will likely benefit from getting the flu shot.
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    Advanced heart failure

    American Heart Association
    Advanced heart failure occurs when heart therapies and symptom management no longer work. Consider the American Heart Association recommendations (in this resource) when you make decisions about advanced heart failure treatments and care plans.
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    Screening: What might help you decide

    Informed Health Online
    Screening tests are more useful if the disease is serious, if the test is reliable, if the test is not harmful and if the disease has better treatment options when detected early. Screening is not a diagnosis and can sometimes lead to a false alarm. This resource includes questions to ask your doctor.
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    Is balneophototherapy an effective treatment for psoriasis?

    Informed Health Online
    Balneophototherapy is a psoriasis treatment that involves bathing in warm water and UV light therapy. Evidence suggests that balneophototherapy is more effective than UV light therapy alone. This type of therapy is offered in hospitals and from dermatologists.
  • Evidence Summary

    Medication reviews do not reduce mortality and hospitalization among nursing home residents

    British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology (2014)
  • Web Resource Rating

    Which approach to breast cancer is right for you?

    Our Bodies, Ourselves
    Women with cancer can now opt for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). This option is for women with cancer who choose to remove their healthy breast. Details about the pros and cons of this approach in this resource.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Type 2 diabetes

    Informed Health Online
    Diabetes is a disease that causes sugar to collect in your blood. Know the symptoms and risk factors for diabetes. Treatment options include lifestyle change, medication and surgery, and depend on your age, physical condition, other diseases, lifestyle and personal goals. Discuss options with your doctor.
  • Web Resource Rating

    End of life care

    Patient.co.uk
    Consider appointing someone you trust to make decisions for you when planning your end of life care. Advanced decisions (or directives) clarify what type of care you want or do not want, if you are ever unable to make a medical decision for yourself. Tips for preparing advanced decisions in this resource.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Menopause hormone therapy and heart disease

    National Women’s Health Network
    Hormone therapy does not prevent heart disease and may increase your risk of a heart attack, stroke or blood clots. Reduce your risk by being active and not smoking. Manage your blood pressure, cholesterol and weight.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Menopause, hormone therapy & aging skin: Is there a connection?

    National Women’s Health Network
    Hormone therapies are unlikely to prevent wrinkles, skin dryness or sagging. The estrogen in hormone therapies can actually cause a dark spotting on the skin. Quit smoking and use sunscreen to help prevent early skin aging.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Making the most of your appointment: Overview

    Health Link B.C.
    Be aware of your symptoms, health conditions, medical history, allergies and medications before your next doctor’s appointment. This resource includes printable forms to help you prepare for appointments.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Screening for hearing problems

    Health Link B.C.
    You may not be aware of hearing loss as it can happen gradually over time. Talk to your doctor if you think you are experiencing hearing loss or if others suggest that you are.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Menopause hormone therapy: Timing doesn’t matter

    National Women’s Health Network
    Menopause hormone therapy does not help improve heart health or blood pressure levels. It also likely does not help improve memory and mood.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Heart screenings for women should be as routine as pap tests

    National Women’s Health Network
    Heart disease can be prevented. Ask your doctor if your family history and body mass index put you at risk, and about cardiovascular screening tests, aspirin safety and other ways you can lower your risk.
  • Web Resource Rating

    CT scan safety

    National Women’s Health Network
    CT scans can expose you to radiation that causes cancer. If your doctor orders a CT, discuss other options (suggestions in this resource). Ask for a radiation shield for your breasts, neck and pelvis if you need a CT scan.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Alzheimer's disease: Treatments

    Bright Focus Foundation
    There are medications that can help control Alzheimer's symptoms and other treatments to help manage agitation, depression or psychotic symptoms that may occur as the disease progresses. Talk to your doctor to discuss whether medication for Alzheimer's is right for you.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Adjuvant therapy: Treatment to keep cancer from returning

    Mayo Clinic
    Adjuvant therapy is a treatment meant to keep cancer from coming back. Some forms of this therapy include chemotherapy, hormone therapy and radiation therapy. Talk to your doctor about risks and side effects.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Your heart failure healthcare team

    American Heart Association
    Develop good relationships with everyone in your healthcare team. Follow their recommendations carefully and let them know how you are doing.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Dental exam

    Mayo Clinic
    Regular dental exams help keep your mouth and teeth healthy and are good for your general health. This resource give suggestions about how to prepare for and what to expect from a dental exam.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Healthy living goals for heart valve patients

    American Heart Association
    Plan your recovery ahead of time when having heart valve surgery. Watch the video on this webpage to learn about how to best communicate with your doctor, what to expect for recovery and how to plan for surgery.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Overcoming barriers to shared decision making

    American Heart Association
    You may have a hard time making choices about your advanced heart failure. Learn about barriers to shared decision making and overcome them by working with your doctor.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Sorting out health concerns

    Canadian Virtual Hospice
    To help your health care team, write down your health concerns and symptoms in detail. This resource includes questions you can consider. This can lead to a physical examination or tests.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Tips for talking with your health care providers

    Canadian Virtual Hospice
    Make a list of what you want to discuss before seeing your health care provider. Bring up what's important to you, including your emotions and concerns. Stick to the topic, be honest and make sure you understand everything. Ask about different options.
  • Web Resource Rating

    When is a hysterectomy needed?

    Our Bodies, Ourselves
    A hysterectomy may be recommended for life-threatening conditions such as invasive cancers, severe pelvic inflammatory disease, uterine bleeding or childbirth complications. Many conditions can be better treated with other therapies.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Implantable medical devices for heart failure

    American Heart Association
    After heart failure, you may require surgery to replace your heart valve and increase blood flow. For serious cases, doctors may recommend an implanted defibrillator to help the heart beat at a normal rhythm.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Options and considerations for heart valve surgery

    American Heart Association
    Your treatment options for heart valve conditions may be medication or surgery. Your doctor may prescribe medicine to reduce your symptoms and correct irregular heartbeats.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Cancer pain: Relief is possible

    Mayo Clinic
    Pain medications, weak opioid medications (codeine), and strong opioid medications (morphine, OxyContin) may help with cancer pain. Talk to your doctor about the side effects and find the option that is best for you.
  • Web Resource Rating

    About arrhythmia

    American Heart Association
    An irregular or abnormal heartbeat is called arrhythmia. This affects your heart's ability to pump blood through your body and can result in damage to your organs. An electrocardiography (ECG) can help diagnose an abnormal heart rhythm.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Symptoms, diagnosis and monitoring of arrhythmia

    American Heart Association
    Serious symptoms of arrhythmia (abnormal or irregular heartbeats) include: fatigue, dizziness, lightheaded, fainting, chest pain or shortness of breath. This resource includes tools to help you monitor and keep track of your pulse and heart rate.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Screening for Breast Cancer

    Cancer Care Ontario
    Finding breast cancer early means a better chance for successful treatment and the cancer is less likely to spread. Mammograms are used as a breast cancer screening tool.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Screening for Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer Care Ontario
    Detecting colorectal cancer early gives you a better chance of being cured. Cancer Care Ontario recommends that all Ontarians between the ages of 50 and 74 receive screening for colorectal cancer every 2 years.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Colorectal cancer risk

    Cancer Care Ontario
    There is a better chance of curing colorectal cancer if it is found early. Cancer Care Ontario recommends you get screened for colectoral cancer every 2 years starting when you are 50 years old. Read more about risk factors, prevention, screening and treatment in this resource.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Lung cancer: Treatment

    Canadian Lung Association
    Treatments for lung cancer depend on your age and stage of lung cancer. Options include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, targeted therapies and photodynamic therapy. Treatment goals can be to cure, slow disease progression, reduce symptoms and to improve quality of life.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Sleep apnea: Treatment

    Canadian Lung Association
    Treatments for mild sleep apnea include weight loss, avoiding alcohol and sedatives, dental appliances or surgery. The only effective treatment for severe sleep apnea is the CPAP machine, which helps you breathe while sleeping.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Pain

    Canadian Virtual Hospice
    Pain is experienced differently by each person. Some strategies to manage pain include muscle relaxation, imagery, distraction, biofeedback, accupuncture, massage, heat or cold therapy. There are also medications that can help manage pain.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Help with medications

    Canadian Virtual Hospice
    It is important to keep track of the medications you take and to keep them organized. Explore alternative options to take your medications if you cannot swallow your pills. Check with a doctor or pharmacist before you change how you take your pills.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Constipation

    Canadian Virtual Hospice
    Constipation can cause symptoms like bloating, abdominal pain, loss of appetite and nausea. To prevent or treat constipation: eat foods high in fibre, drink a lot of fluids and try to increase your physical activity. Talk to your doctor about using oral laxatives, rectal suppositories or enemas. This resource includes links to more information about symptoms, diagnosis and treatment for constipation.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Frequently asked questions about hepatitis C

    Public Health Agency of Canada (aging & seniors)
    Hepatitis C is a virus that you can get from blood to blood contact (eg. contaminated needles or unprotected sex). The course of disease is usually slow and infected people may not show symptoms for more than 20 years. Symptoms include chronic fatigue, stomach pain, joint pain, loss of appetite and nausea. Antiviral medications are often used to treat hepatitis C.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Is surgery beneficial for people with Parkinson's disease

    Aging Care
    Surgery to treat Parkinson's disease can help with symptoms. There are two types of surgery: brain lesioning surgery and deep brain stimulation. Best candidates for surgery are patients with symptoms that cannot be managed by medication. Avoid surgery if you have other serious medical problems.
  • Web Resource Rating

    First aid for seniors

    HealthLine
    Be prepared to provide first aid to seniors if any of these common situations occur: falls, cuts and scrapes, heart attack and stroke, or heat- and cold- related illnesses.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Emerging technologies look deeper into the eyes to catch signs of disease

    National Eye Institute
    It is very difficult for you or your eye doctor to see blood vessels close to the retina, but new technology is allowing for a better look. Two new methods are adaptive optics and optical coherence tomography , though these methods may not be readily available to most eye care professionals.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Clear liquid diet

    Mayo Clinic
    The clear liquid diet clears your stomach, intestines, and digestive system. It is often prescribed by doctors before or after a medical procedure, or if you are experiencing digestive problems. Water, broth, gelatin, coffee, carbonated beverages, and fruit juices without pulp are acceptable in this diet. If you have diabetes, this diet may be risky for you. The clear liquid diet should only be short-term, as it does not provide enough calories or nutrients.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Be active your way

    HealthFinder
    Complete this survey to discover the best way for you to get active.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Get your eyes tested

    HealthFinder
    Have your eyes checked every 2 years, especially for older adults, family history of diabetes or eye disease and people with diabetes.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Get tested for colorectal cancer

    HealthFinder
    If you are age 50 or older, get tested regularly for colorectal cancer. Talk yo your doctor to decide which test is right for you.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Get a bone density test

    HealthFinder
    If you are a woman age 50 to 64, ask your doctor if you need a bone density test and if older than 65 schedule a bone density test. Make sure you are getting enough calcium, vitamin D, physical activity and minimize alcohol consumption and quit smoking.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Dialysis

    NHS Choices
    Dialysis is a life-saving treatment that replicates the kidneys’ function when your kidneys stop working properly.
  • Blog Post

    Ready to quit smoking? Group therapy boosts your chances of success

    Ready to quit smoking? Looking for help and support? Research supports the benefits of group therapy to kick the habit for good!
  • Blog Post

    Still here! Don’t let a dementia diagnosis keep you out of the conversation

    Everyone – including those with dementia – has the right to make decisions that affect their own health. Staying involved and engaged for as long as possible is key to a better quality of life.
  • Blog Post

    Worried about breaking a bone? 5 tips you should know before it happens

    Breaking up may be hard to do, but breaking a bone is easy – especially as we age. Get tips on how to protect yourself.
  • Blog Post

    Recovering from a brain injury? Video games can help!

    They say time flies when you’re having fun. So the key to encouraging people to do their rehabilitation exercises is to make sure they’re enjoyable. Are technology-based games the solution?
  • Blog Post

    What works best for relieving back pain?

    Low back pain can be debilitating but it can be managed with non-drug therapies and medications if needed. What works best? Find out recommendations from recent research evidence.
  • Blog Post

    5 alternative options for pain relief

    Alternative options for managing pain can bring relief without the risks associated with prescription drugs.
  • Blog Post

    Regaining language skills after a stroke: Will speech therapy help?

    Recovering from a stroke often includes recovering language and communications skills. Speech language therapy can help.
  • Blog Post

    Got heartburn? Avoid these common acid-blocking drugs

    Proton pump inhibitors – a common type of stomach acid medication – are overprescribed and many people can safely reduce or stop this medication.
  • Blog Post

    Don't believe the hype: 6 tips to identify trustworthy health information

    Ask yourself these six questions to critique the latest “miraculous” health claim you read about in the headlines.
  • Blog Post

    Is it time for a medication review? Many people take unnecessary meds

    As we grow older, our collection of prescription pills tends to grow larger! A medication review can help you cut down on inappropriate or unnecessary medications.
  • Blog Post

    Stop the spinning: Exercises and manoeuvers that help with vertigo

    Whether or not you’re a fan of amusement parks, no one likes to feel like they’re on a never-ending Tilt-a-Whirl ride! Can exercises and manoeuvers help relieve symptoms of vertigo?
  • Blog Post

    When "good nights" are rare: Do sleeping pills help people with dementia?

    Do sleep aid medications help to improve sleep for people with dementia?
  • Blog Post

    Need help managing medications? Try text message reminders

    Text messaging can have health benefits, including helping people better manage their medications.
  • Blog Post

    A closer look at opioids for chronic pain

    Do the benefits of opioids outweigh the risks? Or, is it time to re-examine their role in relieving pain?
  • Blog Post

    Living with heart failure: How to avoid hospital re-admission

    Many people end up back in the hospital after heart failure. “Transitional care” can help ease the move from hospital to home and avoid repeat visits to the ER.
  • Blog Post

    Erectile dysfunction treatment options

    Erectile dysfunction may be an awkward topic of discussion for some, but it’s a very common condition that affects up to half of all men over the age of 40. Find out what the research says about erectile dysfunction treatment options.
  • Blog Post

    3 simple ways to manage challenging behaviours associated with dementia

    What can caregivers do to help manage common behavior challenges among people with dementia? Three tips supported by research evidence.
  • Blog Post

    Acupuncture: An effective treatment for chronic headaches

    Recent research shows that acupuncture is worth a try for people who suffer from chronic headaches or migraines.
  • Blog Post

    Mini-incision hip replacement surgery: Is it right for you?

    If you or someone you know requires a hip replacement, find out the latest research comparing the benefits of mini-incision to standard surgery.
  • Blog Post

    Weeding out the truth: Cannabis-based medications for cancer patients

    Cannabinoids are active chemicals found in cannabis (marijuana) that are approved for medical use. Research shows they may be a promising way to ease nausea and vomiting from cancer treatment.
  • Blog Post

    Living with heart failure: Effective self-care is key to coping well

    Heart failure is serious but people can live with the condition successfully. Giving people information about how to care for themselves is important, but additional support is necessary to promote effective self-care.
  • Blog Post

    Do self-management programs for diabetes really work?

    Managing diabetes can be challenging for anyone, but for older adults with multiple health and age-related conditions, it can be especially difficult. Dr. Diana Sherifali weighs in on how self-management programs can be adapted to best support older adults with diabetes.
  • Blog Post

    Telemedicine for foot care: Using technology to get back on your feet

    One study suggests that patients receiving follow-up care for diabetic foot or leg ulcers via telemedicine (online or by phone) may spend less time travelling without any negative effect on their health and lower costs to the healthcare system. Dr. Perry Mayer – an expert in diabetic foot care – offers his perspective on the issue.
  • Blog Post

    Facing a difficult health choice? Decision aids can help

    You’ve been given a diagnosis and told of a few treatment options. Now you have a tough choice to make and there’s too much at stake for “eenie, meanie, miny mo.” Patient decision aids are free, easy-to-use tools that can guide you through the process of making important decisions.
  • Blog Post

    News 'flash' for women: the latest findings on hormone therapy for menopause & heart disease

    For years hormone therapy was the “go to” for relieving symptoms of menopause; it was also believed to protect against age-related diseases. Recent evidence sheds a clearer light on how hormone therapy impacts heart health.
  • Blog Post

    Stroke centre or local hospital? In an emergency just call 911!

    Specialized, designated stroke centres help reduce death and disability due to stroke. However, in an emergency, is it worth bypassing closer local hospitals to take stroke victims to a designated centre?
  • Blog Post

    Biologic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis: the rewards may come with risks

    A new type of drug may significantly improve rheumatoid arthritis progression and symptoms, but is associated with potentially serious side effects.
  • Blog Post

    Just a "senior's moment"? What are the best ways to diagnose dementia?

    Although there is no cure for Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia, finding out the best ways to diagnose the condition early may help people to access the best available treatments and support and maintain control and independence for as long as possible.
  • Blog Post

    'Plumbing' problems? Ultrasound an easier way to detect bladder obstructions

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (problems urinating) could be caused by an obstruction. The usual procedure for detecting an obstruction is invasive and uncomfortable. Evidence shows a simpler method is just as accurate.
  • Blog Post

    Medication, psychological therapy… What does the latest research tell us about treatments for depression?

    Depression is a common – but potentially serious – mood disorder that affects how you feel, think and behave. There are choices for treatment, including antidepressants and psychological therapy. Read the latest research about these options.
  • Blog Post

    Improved treatments provide relief for men with lower urinary tract symptoms

    It isn’t something we tend to talk about, or even think about, until there’s a problem. Lower urinary tract symptoms are annoying at best and debilitating at worst. New research shows that combination drug treatment can offer improved long-term symptom relief for this common condition.
  • Blog Post

    Irregular heartbeat a possible side effect of osteoporosis medication

    Bisphosphonates are drugs that help increase bone strength in people with osteoporosis. They are effective, but may also contribute to irregular heartbeats (atrial fibrillation).
  • Blog Post

    New drug may be 'next big thing' in type 2 diabetes management

    A new drug may improve blood sugar control for people with Type 2 diabetes, while helping them avoid weight gain.
  • Blog Post

    Screening for prostate cancer: What you should know about the PSA test

    The PSA test is an option for men thinking about being screened for prostate cancer but the harms may outweigh the benefits.
  • Blog Post

    New blood thinners prove to be safe and effective option for most

    New types of blood thinners are effective at preventing blood clots and are safe for most older adults.
  • Blog Post

    Studies support "risk-based" approach to treating people with high blood pressure

    Drugs that lower blood pressure help prevent heart attack and strokes for those with high blood pressure, and offer the greatest benefit to those at higher risk.
  • Blog Post

    Getting a good night's sleep: Options for people with obstructive sleep apnea

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common condition that affects breathing during sleep. Treatments such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and dental devices can help.
  • Blog Post

    It's probably not serious - will getting it checked ease your mind?

    Diagnostic tests do not improve symptoms or relieve anxiety for patients who do not have a serious illness.
  • Blog Post

    Tips for a more rewarding visit with your family physician

    Patients visiting their doctors often complain that they must restrict what they discuss with them to only one health problem at each visit, which isn’t helpful. There are different approaches.
  • Blog Post

    Hearing loss, part 3: Why does everyone mumble? What’s that again? What does an audiogram tells you about your hearing and what doesn’t it tell you?

    The results of a basic hearing test, an audiogram, might help to better understand your hearing difficulties; but not all age-related hearing loss can be detected by an audiogram.
  • Blog Post

    Balancing guidelines and drugs in those with multiple health conditions

    Many suffer from multiple chronic conditions and clinical practice guidelines may not consider the unique needs of older adults. An individualized approach that incorporates values and goals may be the best plan.
  • Blog Post

    Drugs for people with Alzheimer’s disease: What they do, who pays for them, and why governments don’t pay more

    Existing drugs for Alzheimer’s disease treat symptoms, but are not a cure. Health care funders restrict drug plan coverage because of their limited effects.
  • Blog Post

    Treating behavioural problems of dementia: When confusion leads to controversy

    The majority of people with Alzheimer’s will develop behaviour problems over time and this causes much suffering and stress for patients and caregivers. There are solutions to manage this.
  • Blog Post

    Polypharmacy, part 4. Medication review encourages best use and reduces adverse effects.

    Periodically ask a healthcare provider to check your medications. This can ensure the least harm and most benefit overall, and reduce drugs taken and interactions in polypharmacy.
  • Blog Post

    Polypharmacy, part 3. Online drug interaction checkers to assess side effects.

    Online drug interaction checkers are useful, but have some problems with identifying adverse effects. Always talk to a healthcare provider to confirm your risk for side effects.
  • Blog Post

    Polypharmacy, part 2. Risk of drug effects with multiple medications in the elderly: aging changes.

    Aging may change the effects and risk profile of different drugs. Polypharmacy may increase, decrease, or cancel effects of different drugs, foods, and supplements.
  • Blog Post

    Polypharmacy, part 1. Pitfalls of multiple medications: taking multiple drugs and risk of interactions.

    Many older Canadians are taking multiple medications (polypharmacy) to manage their health conditions. Taking 5 or more medications can increase your risk of drug interactions.
  • Blog Post

    Multimorbidity: how to improve quality of life when managing several chronic health conditions

    If you have 3 or more health conditions, ask your family doctor about better ways to coordinate your care with other health professionals, and how you might decrease important health risks or improve key functional activities.

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