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Vaccination

Older adults are more susceptible to certain kinds of ailments such as the flu, pneumonia or shingles. Our resources provide evidence-based information about vaccines including those for seasonal influenza. Talk with your doctor to make sure you get the vaccines that are right for you.

'Tis the season... Have you had your flu shot yet?
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The shingles vaccine: Should you get it?
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  • Evidence Summary

    Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy adults.

    Cochrane Database Syst Rev (2018)
  • Evidence Summary

    Vaccines for preventing influenza in the elderly.

    Cochrane Database Syst Rev (2018)
  • Evidence Summary

    Vaccines for preventing herpes zoster in older adults.

    Cochrane Database Syst Rev (2016)
  • Evidence Summary

    Flu vaccines lower risk of pneumonia and death among older adults living in care

    Journal of the American Medical Directors Association (2014)
  • Evidence Summary

    Interventions to increase influenza vaccination rates of those 60 years and older in the community

    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2014)
  • Evidence Summary

    Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy adults.

    Cochrane Database Syst Rev (2014)
  • Evidence Summary

    Flu vaccine reduces cardiovascular events

    JAMA (2013)
  • Web Resource Rating

    How much protection do flu vaccinations offer?

    Informed Health Online
    Get the flu shot every year. This can reduce your risk of getting the flu by more than half. The flu shot is especially important for people over the age of 60, or anyone with asthma, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or HIV.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Who should get the shingles vaccine? If I've already had shingles, should I get the vaccine so I don't get shingles again?

    Mayo Clinic
    You should get the shingles vaccine (Zostavax) if you are 60 or older, even if you have had shingles before. This protects your body from reactivating the chickenpox virus that causes shingles.
  • Web Resource Rating

    HPV: Should I Get the Vaccine?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps people under 26 who have not had the vaccine decide on whether or not to get the HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    HPV: Should I Get the Vaccine?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps people under 26 who have not had the vaccine decide on whether or not to get the HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options.
  • Web Resource Rating

    How does Fluzone High-Dose differ from other flu vaccines?

    Mayo Clinic
    Fluzone High-Dose is a flu vaccine for adults over 65 that is intended to protect older adults better than the regular flu shot. Side effects of this vaccine include fever and soreness. More research is needed about its effectiveness.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Flu shot: Your best bet for avoiding influenza

    Mayo Clinic
    Flu shots are one of the best ways to protect against influenza and its complications. These shots are recommended for everyone over the age of 6 months. Check with your doctor before getting a flu shot if you have an allergy to eggs or if you've had a bad reaction to a previous flu shot.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Shingles (Herpes Zoster)

    Patient.co.uk
    This article describes the cause, symptoms and treatments for shingles. There is a safe vaccine that you can get to prevent shingles.
  • Web Resource Rating

    The inconvenient truth of vaccine refusal

    Harvard Health Letter
    Vaccines have risks and side effects. However, you are more likely to catch a disease or illness if you are not vaccinated against it. More outbreaks occur when more people choose not to vaccinate, and people are often contagious before they realize they are sick.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Flu shots: Especially important if you have heart disease

    Mayo Clinic
    Heart disease puts you at higher risk of complications from the flu. Getting a flu shot can help protect you. Flu shots are safe for most people with heart disease, talk to your doctor if you are unsure.
  • Web Resource Rating

    How can you protect yourself from respiratory infections?

    Informed Health Online
    Viruses that cause respiratory infections spread through droplets that travel from someone with the cold or flu virus to others. Wash your hands often, cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue and get a flu shot to reduce your risk of infection.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Flu, chills and other ills: A wintry round-up of Cochrane evidence

    Evidently Cochrane
    A recent review update found that there is no evidence that antibiotics are beneficial for adults with colds or flu and can cause more harm than good. Another review found that patients undergoing chemotherapy will likely benefit from getting the flu shot.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Flu Vaccines: Should I Get a Flu Vaccine?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps people decide on whether or not to get a flu vaccine by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options.
  • Patient Decision Aid

    Flu Vaccines: Should I Get a Flu Vaccine?

    OHRI
    This patient decision aid helps people decide on whether or not to get a flu vaccine by comparing the benefits, risks, and side effects of both options.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Influenza immunisation

    Patient.co.uk
    Get the flu shot every year to protect against the seasonal flu if you are over 65 years old, pregnant, have diabetes, have a poor immune system or have chronic heart and lung conditions. Do not get the flu shot if you have severe egg allergies or have had bad reactions to the flu shot before.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Fact sheet: Shingles (herpes zoster)

    Public Health Agency of Canada (aging & seniors)
    Shingles can cause pain and rash for months. It can be treated with antiviral medication or prevented by getting the vaccine. Avoid scratching the rash as this can cause a second infection.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Hepatitis

    Public Health Agency of Canada (aging & seniors)
    Prevent hepatitis: wash your hands regularly, have safe sex and avoid sharing items that may touch blood. Some people with hepatitis do not show symptoms, but some include: fever, fatigue, jaundice, stomach pain and vomiting. There are hepatitis vaccines for Types A&B.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Hepatitis B: Get the facts

    Public Health Agency of Canada (aging & seniors)
    Hepatitis B can have no symptoms, but some symptoms include fatigue, dark urine, jaundice and vomiting. Protect yourself from hepatitis B: get vaccinated, avoid sharing drug equipment and personal items such as razors, and practice safe sex.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)

    Public Health Agency of Canada (aging & seniors)
    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually-transmitted infections. Most people with an HPV infection do not have symptoms, but some types of HPV can lead to serious problems like cervical, penile or anal cancer. Lower your risk of HPV: practice safe sex and consider the HPV vaccine.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Vaccine schedule for adults

    WebMD
    Adult vaccinations are important for lifelong health. Talk to your doctor about which common vaccinations are right for you.
  • Web Resource Rating

    Flu and the flu vaccine

    NHS Choices
    If you are over 65 or have a serious medical condition, you may be more vulnerable to the effects of flu. Talk to your doctor about getting an annual flu shot.
  • Blog Post

    The shingles vaccine: Should you get it?

    Shingles is a painful condition that can attack anyone who has ever had chicken pox, but is most likely to strike older adults and others with weakened immune systems. A vaccine is available that cuts the chance of getting shingles by half. Is it worth it? Dr. Mark Loeb provides a professional view and shingles patient Jean shares her personal experience.
  • Blog Post

    'Tis the season... Have you had your flu shot yet?

    It’s quick, easily available, virtually painless and the first line of attack against a nasty bout of flu. The flu vaccine is recommended for everyone and is particularly critical for those with weakened or compromised immune systems such as older adults living in long-term care facilities.
  • Evidence Summary

    Interventions to increase influenza vaccination rates of those 60 years and older in the community

    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2014)

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